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In Of Mice and Men, the characters Candy and Crooks features at the bottom of the Tyler Ranch hierarchy.

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Introduction

Candy and Crooks In Of Mice and Men, the characters Candy and Crooks features at the bottom of the Tyler Ranch hierarchy. Throughout, the novella both Candy and Crooks are coherent with the themes of loneliness, friendship, dreams and the predatory nature exemplified in the microcosm of American society, that is the Tyler Ranch. The reader is introduced to the characters of Candy within the initial parts of the novel. He appears as a ?swamper?, one of the degraded jobs in the ranch he has earned, partly due to his age, as well as being incapacitated by his lost hand. It becomes apparent that he introduces most of the characters before they actually appear themselves. Candy is likewise used to identify and provide insight onto the lives of the ranch workers. When he shows George and Lennie the bunkhouse, he provides information such as the blacksmith named ?Whitey?. It is also through Candy that the itinerant nature of the ranch life is emphasized with how the workers including the blacksmith leave for another ranch. ...read more.

Middle

When Candy hears of their dream he is pathetically eager to join them, he offers his life savings towards the purchase of the farm. True to the nature of tragedy, Steinbeck makes the vision of the farm so beautiful, and so close to reality and the fraternal bond between George and Lennie so strong, in order to place his protagonists at a considerable height from which to fall. On the other hand, the character of Crooks is yet another indispensable character in the novel. Appearing very briefly in one chapter, Steinbeck is able to prove his worth and importance effectively. Crooks is initially described through the voice of Candy, as the ?nigger? who was ?given hell by the boss.? When the reader is first introduced to Crooks, his possessions are revealed which entirely summarise his qualities. The ?big alarm clock? he owns, ?the number of shoes and boots? are clear examples of how he takes care of himself while briefly revealing how he to is a victim of loneliness. ...read more.

Conclusion

The fact that ?a guy goes nuts without anybody? becomes true as Crooks becomes jealous of Lennie?s friendship with George, to an extent that it drives him to torment Lennie on how ?suppose George never comes back?. This tragic and lonely existence of Crooks is also reinforced with how Curley?s wife threatens to have him lynched, which ?reduced him to nothing.? Crooks as a result, portrays the archetype of people ostracized by their race. Candy and Crooks are unique characters but have certain similarities. Steinbeck employs them to reveal two brief examples of how people are discriminated in society. They both suffer from the tormenting nature of loneliness, and are ensnared by their own disabilities. Hence trapped in the oppressively harsh nature of the microcosm of American society, that is the Tyler Ranch. I believe that both Crooks and Candy are tow characters who help to render the tragic and depressing nature of ranch life, while individually contributing their roles to the novel: Crooks as the discriminated stable-buck suffering from loneliness and Candy as the man torn between life and his debilitating age. ...read more.

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