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In order to establish Preistley's main aim, in the play 'an inspector calls' it will be necessary to look at and understand the aims of any dramatist.

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Introduction

In order to establish Preistley's main aim, in the play 'an inspector calls' it will be necessary to look at and understand the aims of any dramatist. The first aim is to entertain. All dramatists wish to entertain so that they can proceed in their careers well. Preistley was no exception to this he aimed to entertain and he did so very well. To keep the audiences interest and attention is a rare skill and involves twists and mysteries throughout the play. Interesting characters and views or opinions must be displayed which will involve the audience so they become entertained. Twists, arguments, emotions all have a part in the play, which makes the play more exciting and interesting. Another aim of a dramatist is to preach a message. Most plays have a moral to the storyline. These messages are usually displayed through the characters in either their lives or through argumentative comments. Priestley is definitely no exception to these common aims. He kept the play 'an inspector calls' mysterious, and full of shocking twists that nobody in the audience would think. It made the play very interesting and satisfying. The use of guilt, love, time and mystery are all used well in the play. The love of Gerald and Sheila broken, the guilt Eric portrays, the mystery of the inspector and the mystery of the time loop are all important factors to what makes this play very entertaining and pleasing. Also the inspector adds comments when questioning or receiving answers from the family. ...read more.

Middle

This quote is sort of a warning to the inspector to watch himself and be careful what he implies. He is self-centred and cares mainly about himself and watches hi reputation constantly. Mentioning his business constantly in all speeches he makes. When Gerald and Sheila where celebrating their engagement Birling makes another small speech but it is discussing the new business partner made not the new son-in-law, "Your just the kind of son in law i've always wanted. Your father and I have been friendly rivals in business for sometime...and now you've brought us together to have lower costs at higher prices!" Birling tends also to get things wrong. He mentions issues that we as a later audience know are incorrect but at the time he believed along with others that wars will never happen and the titanic was unsinkable. The main question about Birling is should and can we like this man? Well in one sense he is arrogant and self centers, as he accepts no guilt or blame and refuses all allegations to be part of this girls death, but on the other side he is a business man and is very protective, therefore he could just be protecting his family and the things most important to him like any business man would do. Also there's the issue of him believing in no wars as everyone will mind their own and nothing will happen, where we know he is wrong but every one at that time thought there would be no wars and believed the titanic was unsinkable. ...read more.

Conclusion

The inspector made warnings to the elder generations mainly using fire blood and anguish meaning hell, war and personal suffering. The lesson will be learnt sooner or later but it would be easier to learn it sooner or pay the consequences later. When the inspector first arrived the doorbell rang then he entered and changed everything, once the inspector had gone and all things had changed, Gerald and the rest discover he was not an inspector but the phone rings and a second inspector is arriving for the same questioning. The doorbell and the phone ringing is a dramatic device used to show a circular view of time. The Birlings are given a second chance of time to change their future outcome and their involvement in this girl's death. The audience's response will be mainly mysterious. Questions such as will they change their story? Will appear in their mind and they will leave the theatre thinking of the characters involvement and reactions. Birling and Mrs. Birling and also a but Gerald are claiming no blame and guilt but Sheila and Eric are affected by it and are realizing that if they had changed there ways this may not have happened. I think that the audience will go out thinking more on Sheila and Eric's side and that they will become more socialist thinking. It has affected them by changing their points of views and there feelings towards others and themselves. I think that this was Preistley's main aim all along. To change capitalist thinking and everyone else to socialists. For the better of others. ...read more.

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