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In order to show that Act 5 scene ii, is a fitting close to the play Hamlet. I will be looking at how the characters have been brought to a close. I will also be looking at themes and the importance of order being restored in the court

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Introduction

With close reference to language examine how fitting a close Act 5 scene ii forms to the play. In order to show that Act 5 scene ii, is a fitting close to the play Hamlet. I will be looking at how the characters have been brought to a close. I will also be looking at themes and the importance of order being restored in the court at the end of the play. The scene ties up all the relationships that were formed during the course of the play. Hamlet and Horatio, a friendship that we have seen grow and strengthen through the course of the play is broken by Hamlet's death. The close connection that Hamlet shared with his mother is separated by their deaths. The unhealthy relationships that were formed, like that of Claudius and Laertes. They become victims of their own trap and are parted from each other. Starting off with the characters, "We defy augury. There is special providence in the fall of a sparrow. If it be now, 'tis not to come; if it be not to come, it will be now; if it be not now, yet it will come. The readiness is all." There is considerable change in Hamlet's character since the last time we saw him, that is before he went on his sea voyage to England. When we first met him in Act 1 scene ii, Hamlet was a lonely character, still mourning his fathers death and very un-happy about his mother's "o' er-hasty marriage" to his uncle Claudius. After the encounter with his dead father's ghost he puts on "an antic disposition" and uses this strange behaviour to discover whether or not his uncle Claudius is guilty of killing his father. ...read more.

Middle

He tells the assembled members of court that he is "but hurt." Claudius has caused a lot of disorder in the State. By usurping the throne, he has unbalanced the order of succession to the Throne. By right, on the demise of the Old King Hamlet, his son Hamlet, could take over sovereignty of the State. But by Claudius taking over the throne and marrying his sister-in-law, he has caused the spirit of the Old King to rise out of his grave in order to seek revenge and avenge his murder. Claudius's hineous act, that is killing his brother in order to be King, and then his plotting and scheming against Hamlet, for example sending him to England to be killed, the duel and the poisoned wine; reflects the social ideas of revenge in the Elizabethan era. "No, no, the drink, the drink! O my dear Hamlet! The drink, the drink! I am poison'd." One can just hear the agony with which Queen Gertrude cries out her last words to her son. Her warning about the wine shows her true love and concern for Hamlet. She's always wanted the best for him. For example in Act 5, scene i, when she is scattering flowers into Ophelia's grave she says to the dead Ophelia, that she hoped that she would have been Hamlet's bride; because she knew how much Hamlet adored Ophelia, and that his behaviour towards her changed after his father's death and his mother's "o' er-hasty marriage". During the duel she asks him to wipe the sweat off his face, she drinks to his fortune, and then warns him not to drink the wine, so that he may not have the same fate as her. ...read more.

Conclusion

The scene brings to an end all the corruption that Denmark was steeped in. All the characters who aided "then human canker" example Polonius, Ophelia, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern and Laertes; and the victims of Claudius's deviousness, Hamlet ,the Queen Gertrude and Claudius himself are dead. These characters meet their end either through "carnal, bloody, and unnatural acts, accidental judgements, casual slaughters" or "Of deaths put on by cunning and forc'd cause". When Hamlet puts Denmark in the hands of Fortinbras and dies on the throne, he is bringing an end to all the corruption that Denmark suffered during Claudius's reign. Hence we see that Act 5 scene ii, is a fitting close to the play Hamlet because, all the relationships, corruption and plotting that had begun in the beginning of the play has come to a halt, and has ended. We are given a last insight into the characters of Claudius and Gertrude, in their dying lines. "O my dear Hamlet! The drink, the drink! I am poison'd." We see her love for her son Hamlet. And her loyalty toward Claudius, even while on her death bed she wont give away his secret; that he has poisoned the wine to kill Hamlet. "O yet defend me, friends. I am but hurt." Very characteristic of Claudius, who was possessive of the power and authority he had gained by killing his brother. He is so possessive of the power and authority that he is not willing to give it up, even when he is dying. The most important element that makes this scene a fitting close to the play is the restoration of order into the troubled state of Denmark. In his dying speech Hamlet hands over Denmark's Sovereignty to Fortinbras. This would have put the Elizabethan audiences mind at rest, as they strongly believed in order; and considered it extremely essential in the running of a country. ...read more.

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