• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

In R.C. Sherriff's

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Essay The character in R.C. Sherriff's play, Journeys End, Stanhope is Captain of company C. Before the war he was strongly apposed to drinking and smoking; hitting anyone whom he found doing so, getting quite passionate about it. Stanhope was also a fan of playing rugger and cricket. The war has taken its toll on him however, both in positive and negative ways. One side; a dedicated captain who has won an honour (military Cross), the other; a poor excuse of a man; drinking and smoking, things which he despised so. Raleigh's arrival shook Stanhope up a bit; seeing him for the first time in years. He is anxious that Raleigh would tell his sister (Stanhope's fianc�e) about how he has change. Sherriff presentation of Stanhope is both heroic, yet also the part of him which is a drunken mess. Stanhope wishes to censor the letters to confirm whether or not Raleigh has written anything bad about him. Sherriff shows Stanhope's anger by the conflict between him and Raleigh; with short, sharp sentences and periodical intervals of silence. For example: "He stops as he notices the abrupt silence that follows his entry," this pause instantly creates tension. ...read more.

Middle

At the beginning of the scene, Osborne and Raleigh's have an exchange. The details aren't important however; Osborne is trying to avoid conflict between Stanhope and Raleigh by getting Raleigh out of there and cleaning the rifles. Osborne doesn't take sides during the argument he merely tries to stay out of it and help them both; his calm nature helps Stanhope to feel his guilt. ********************************************** In Act 2 scene 2, Stanhope is portrayed as a different leader. Hibbert is trying to escape from the trenches by pretending he has neuralgia. However, more likely is that he has a mental condition; shell shock etc (many men at the had mental conditions but this wasn't known till recently; people who tried to get away from the war-unless they had a physical disability-were shot as deserters). You can almost immediately tell that Stanhope is in control during the opening of the conversation between Hibbert and himself. "You have?" This is Hibbert's reaction to Stanhope telling him that he also has neuralgia. Stanhope catches Hibbert off guard; he acts like its no big deal whereas Hibbert is trying to worm his way home with the same condition; Stanhope is beginning to break apart Hibbert's lie at this point. ...read more.

Conclusion

The audience doesn't know whether or not he is going to shoot as he can be very unpredictable at times; the fact he ignores Hibbert's rants during the countdown suggest no sympathy. At this time the tension is high as Hibbert is ready to die and Stanhope shows no emotion; Stanhope seems to be brutally cruel. When Hibbert admits the truth, Stanhope is sympathetic: "I've tried like hell-I swear I have...]. Stanhope sits down beside Hibbert and puts an arm round his shoulder] I know what you feel Hibbert. I've known all along] How can you know?] Because I feel the same-exactly the same! " The physical gesture of putting an arm round his shoulder shows welcoming, kindness, friendliness etc. He also sympathises with Hibbert by saying he feels the exact same way; he demonstrates camaraderie by opening up to Hibbert and by telling him his true feelings; characteristics of a good leader, connection with the troops, a sympathetic ear and camaraderie. In conclusion, Stanhope is a good leader. Although he has a temper, can be petty at times and is a bad drunk; he always remains loyal to his troops even to the bitter end; he often puts his men before himself, a valiant display of camaraderie. ?? ?? ?? ?? Andrew Cruickshank ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE RC Sheriff section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE RC Sheriff essays

  1. English 4UO Independent Study - Comparative Essay

    By allowing his readers to connect emotionally with Santiago, Coelho is encouraging his readers to recognize the gold, or Personal Legends, in the rocks, or normalities, of everyday life. On the path of his journey Santiago is able to find true love, his sole meaning for living, and fulfill a spiritual void in his life as a result.

  2. Explore the different ways that Sherriff reveals courage to the audience?

    "It's this beastly neuralgia...the beastly pain gets worse every day." The other soldiers, however, are aware of Hibbert's scheme, especially Stanhope, he says "Another little worm trying to wriggle home." This scenario about Hibbert's "illness" then leads on to a very intense moment in the play.

  1. Journal Entry

    It was very lucky really as I thought that I saw another one weaving his way through the maze of trenches towards us. On our way out of the German trenches however we were suddenly under attack. As we retreated, the Germans open fired and one of our men was

  2. 20th Century Drama - Journey's End, R C Sheriff

    One hundred and forty-four little circles-one for each hour of six days. He's blacked in six already. He's six hours behind" and presents another of Sheriffs dramatic devices. He frequently uses the counting down of time in this play. This shows both the monotony of the trench life and the

  1. Compare and Contrast the Presentation of the Psychological Effects of the WarAnd the Setting ...

    It's understandable to the reader that Hilliard feels the initial 'disinclination' to meet Barton, as Hill writes that 'he did not make close friends' and perhaps was worried about meeting someone who wished to be a close companion. The reader knows Hilliard to be quite an isolated character; '...he could

  2. Explain what Osborne means to Stanhope and how is this shown in the play

    He feels that he can no longer look at things in the same way. He is very disturbed by his "habit... to look right through things". His feelings of vulnerability are revealed when he wonders "You don't think I'm going potty, do you?"

  1. Journey's end - Focusing on the exchange between Stanhope and Hibbert in act two, ...

    In a novel or play, there is no visual effect to produce an image of a character, so therefore, the best written works are the books which have a great sense of imagination, a very realistic feel. This is produced by clever and imaginative use of staging and especially language.

  2. Do you have any sympathy at all for Hibbert? Give evidence for your opinion

    He looks rotten.? Osborne, a former teacher with far more experience of the world and understanding of people than the young Stanhope has more compassion and probably understands that even if the neuralgia is feigned or exaggerated, there is an underlying psychological problem which is leading Hibbert to want to leave the front.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work