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In Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet" poor communication and bad advice do often lead to misunderstanding and disaster. I am going write about three occasions, all of which contribute, to the tragic ending of the play.

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Introduction

Romeo and Juliet In Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet" poor communication and bad advice do often lead to misunderstanding and disaster. I am going write about three occasions, all of which contribute, to the tragic ending of the play, one for each Romeo and Juliet and one, which affects both and leads to the tragic ending of the play. Shakespeare used dramatic tension often in "Romeo and Juliet". He created it by using dramatic irony. This is where the reader/audience knows something the characters do not and this causes them to have a different understanding of the situation. Hence the dramatic tension between the reader/audience and the characters, who do not possess all the facts. An example of dramatic tension in the play is the first meeting of Romeo and Juliet at the masquers ball neither of them realises who the other is. Juliet sends the Nurse to find out who he is. In the Nurses absence she says to herself if he is married her wedding bed is going to be her deathbed. "My grave is like to be my wedding bed." This shows that she was already in love with him. (Love at first sight). When the Nurse returns and tells her who he is, she says to herself "My only love sprung from my only hate". Tragedy is a literary term and is not linked to real people; though in reality a tragedy is a tragic occurrence. ...read more.

Middle

The breakdowns in communication between Juliet and her parents become obvious in act 3, scene 5. This is a crucial point in the play as Juliet cannot tell her parents why she will not marry Paris. Romeo and Juliet part after spending their wedding night together. This upsets Juliet, and, when her mother comes to see her, Lady Capulet misunderstands why Juliet is upset. She believes Juliet is grieving for Tybalt. Juliet's conversation with her mother is full of double meanings. "God pardon him; I do with all my heart; and yet no man like he doth grieve my heart." Juliet is referring to Romeo. Due to dramatic irony, the audience know that Juliet is grieving for Romeo, not angry at him for murdering Tybalt, as her mother, lady Capulet, thinks. This is a prime example of the breakdowns in communication between Juliet and her parents. And yet no man like he doth grieve my heart." Dramatic tension is created again because we, the audience, know what she really means. When Juliet refuses to marry Paris on Thursday, her mother doesn't understand. "Fie, fie, what, are you mad!" She thinks Juliet is still upset about Tybalt and that she's mad for saying no. Her mother doesn't understand that she would be betraying Romeo if she married Paris. Her Father is angry with Juliet because she was disobeying him and it just was not done then, he doesn't understand why she's refusing either. ...read more.

Conclusion

Juliet, however, refuses to leave with the friar when she sees Romeo dead. She reaches out and tales his dagger and says "O happy dagger! This is thy sheath; There rust and let me die." She then stabs herself in the heart. Then the watch enters and arrests the Friar and Balthasar, the Prince and the Captain of the watch enter with the Capulets. Montague and Capulet enter the tomb and Montague tells everyone lady Montague has died if grief due to Romeo's banishment. When Montague and Capulet see Romeo, Juliet and Paris all dead, Friar Lawrence explains everything with the help of Balthasar and Paris' Page. Capulet and Montague end their feud and decide to put up golden statues of Romeo and Juliet; after the Prince says "All are punished." The Prince sums up the whole play with a rhyming caplet. "For never was a story of more woe Than this of Juliet and her Romeo" There are a lot of misunderstandings in this scene. This is where all of the Friar's bad advice begins to become apparent and all the misunderstanding that have taken place. Everything that could possibly go wrong in this scene does. Dramatic tension is creates a lot in this scene through dramatic irony. Shakespeare successfully wrote a tragedy according to Sophocles definition of it; at the end of the play you feel a great sense of loss and pity for all involved. The couple are quite clearly doomed by fate quite early on in the play, and despite their best efforts, they lose their desperate fight against fate. Michelle Pennington ...read more.

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