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In spite of its title 'Romeo and Juliet' has few scenes In which both lovers are present of stage. Examine the Importance of these Key Moments.

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Introduction

In spite of its title 'Romeo and Juliet' has few scenes In which both lovers are present of stage. Examine the Importance of these Key Moments And consider how Shakespeare Manages to Present a Love Affair That is Brief yet True It is the techniques which Shakespeare uses in the vital scenes when Romeo and Juliet are together that help to make one of the most famous true love stories ever. If the audience questions the love of Romeo and Juliet at any time, the power of emotion in the events of the play can be easily lost. Their love is proved by how many risks and sacrifices they are willing to take in order to be together. Shakespeare has to make the audience believe that two people can fall in love in seconds without even talking to each other. I think it would have been more believable in the sixteenth century, when it was written, because people fell in love carelessly, not for a person's soul or good nature but for their high class or wealth. This would have made Romeo and Juliet's love more believable as true love to a sixteenth century audience because they are undeterred by each other's family past. Today, people may question how Romeo and Juliet could fall in love, marry and die in less than a week or in the "two hours traffic of our stage". Nevertheless a modern audience can still be hit with all the power of an emotional and believable true love story. Throughout the play there is the theme of fate, that Romeo and Juliet have no control over their lives. This is mainly created by the prologue, which sets out the tragic ending before the play even begins, "A pair of star crossed lovers take their lives". Although the audience knows the ending, this doesn't make the play entirely predictable. They still don't know how they come to meet their deaths. ...read more.

Middle

It also makes it different from the love which Romeo and Rosaline shared as that was presented in a childish way with Romeo acting as a man in love was expected to. The uniqueness of Romeo and Juliet's love makes it true as they are acting irrationally to be together at all costs and not behave in a way that was expected of young people at that time or indeed any time. In this scene there are more associations with fate and heaven. Juliet is given such compliments as, "Two of the fairest stars in all heaven...do entreat her eyes" and "...bright angel..." This has become one of the themes of Romeo and Juliet's love, that it is something more than what every one else's idea of love is. Theirs is heavenly and pure. This theme becomes so strong that by the end of the play heaven and fate have taken over and the lives of Romeo and Juliet are taken by it. Again in this scene Romeo exaggerates his feelings of love and romance and uses hyperbole to create dramatic effect, "With loves light wings did I o'er perch these walls..." and when told that he could be killed he replies, "Alack there lies more peril in thine eye Than twenty of their swords; look thou but sweet, And I am proof against their enmity." Although an audience of the 16th century would have believed in Romeo's speech, it makes it more difficult for modern audience as Romeo goes too far. Up to this point in the scene we can be lead into thinking Romeo only wants Juliet for her beauty and isn't intending to make a commitment. However any scepticism is removed when they decide to marry. Neither character proposes yet they both accept that marriage is their next step. This would surprise a modern audience, but when it was written it would have been obvious for two people in love to do that. The commitment of marriage strengthens their true love. ...read more.

Conclusion

When they are not together, they are planning the next time they will be. Their love seems undeniably true except one flaw which makes me cast doubt on Juliet's commitment: the fact that she didn't run away to live with Romeo in Mantua when he was banished. However, I'm thinking from a 21st century point of view and it is possible that when the play was written, no Shakespearean audience would have even considered a young girl running away as women were considered more dependent and weak in the 16th century. There are many reasons why the love of Romeo and Juliet is so believable. They are always grateful and contagiously happy to have each other; they talk poetically to each other in beautiful language which forces the audience to feel the passionate emotions of the play; and they both make sacrifices to be with each other. Juliet betrays her family and gives up the safe and secure life she could have had with Paris and Romeo ironically offers three times to die for Juliet. However, the most conclusive piece of evidence in the play which suggests that Romeo and Juliet truly love each other is that they would rather die than live without each other so they make the ultimate sacrifice. Even though they had only known each other for only four days, their love was to become eternal in death. Their love began from their first meeting and grew into an emotionally volatile relationship which was out of their control. The theme of fate excuses any argument that Romeo and Juliet can't be in love because they haven't known each other long enough. Their love is something deeper than that. In fact, I think that the brevity of Romeo and Juliet's love adds to the excitement and passion of their relationship. In conclusion, this is a play which includes impeccable timing, poetic language, dramatic qualities, heroic characters and an emotive plot so that anyone, with even the most hidden romantic hopes, can't help but believe in the true passion and "...woe of Juliet and her Romeo." Rachael Little ...read more.

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