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In the beginning of my second story, written by Charles Dickens, The Signalman, the s

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Introduction

Murder mystery stories coursework Write about the ingredients essential to create a successful mystery story. Introduction I have studied pre-1900 short stories by different authors, which all follow a similar format and historical content of their time. In my essay I will discuss and describe what necessary ingredients are needed to make these murder mystery short stories effective and successful. Short stories became an extremely favoured form of fiction and entertainment during the nineteenth century... In the days before electrical advantages for entertainment, (e.g:-radio, television, films and videos) adventure was generally only discovered/only existed within the imagination of mystery and supernatural stories, and were especially popular in the Victorian age, where people would escape into the mystifying worlds the words described in the stories. (Perhaps these authors' fulfilled the need for excitement in this relatively oppressed society...). It was during this era that many writers began to capture readers' curiosity about death, vengeance, trickery, imprisonment, hanging, ghosts and fear... A first impression may affect/ determine the way the words will communicate with its reader throughout a story. So I feel it important that the begining of a mystery story must be (engaging, compelling, intriguing, appealing, capture the imagination/ attentions of the audience) immediately for it to be successful. Mystery= arcane, baffling, curious, enigmatic, incomprehesible, inexplicable, insoluable, magical, miraculous, mystifying, obscure, perplexing, puzzling, secret, strange, uncanny, unexplained, unfathomable, unknown, wierd, bizarre, puzzle, problem, riddle, abnormal, supernatural. Murderous= barbaric, bloodthirsty, brutal, cruel, dangerous, deadly, ferocious, fierce, homocidal, pitiless, ruthless, savage, vicious, violent, assassin. The overall effect of the above ingredients, if successfully combined, will ensure the reader is first drawn in, by capturing their imagination, and they are then compelled to keep reading until the end. Beginings In the begining of our first story The Adventure of the Engineers Thumb by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1892) (who is the creator of the famous characters Sherlock Holmes and Dr. ...read more.

Middle

The following characters I believe, really contributed to the story's themes', therefore the story's success from the readers point of view. The Adventure of the Engineer's Thumb by Sir Arthur Doyle (1892) Dr. Watson By the story suddenly beginning, it became immediately intriguing to me and I was already caught up in where the story would escape to. Dr. Watson introduces the story, although he doesn't tell the reader his identity at first. The narrator is Dr. Watson and is telling the story in the first person because he is a main character to the story. He expects the reader to have read previous stories, but to engage with the them, Dr Watson tells the story, (in first person), after a personal introduction of Sherlock Holmes and himself, making the reader feel included and thus hopefully/perhaps makes the reader curious to read on. 'T'was the Summer of '89, not long after my marriage, that the events occured which I am now about to summarise. I had returned to civil practice, and had finally abandoned Holmes in his Baker Street rooms, although I continually visited him and ocassionally even persuaded him to forgo his Bohemian habits so far as to come and visit us...' 'T'was the Summer of '89, not long after my marriage, that the events occured which I am now about to summarise. I had returned to civil practice, and had finally abandoned Holmes in his Baker Street rooms, although I continually visited him and ocassionally even persuaded him to forgo his Bohemian habits so far as to come and visit us...' -Only after a couple of paragraphs are you suddenly aware that he has begun the story, because he slightly drags out long sentences, describing who he and Sherlock Holmes are, and events in their lives which he recalls leading up to happening at the same time as the case. ' By the story begining suddenly/unexpectantly, it became immediately intriguing to me and I was already caught up in where the story would escape to. ...read more.

Conclusion

4 The reader finds out what happens to malcolmson at the same time as when the neighbours do; when they assembled at the sound of the alarm bell sounded ...which had been pulled by the weight of his body, with the bells' rope-noosed around his neck. This ending is quite far-fetched because the judges spirit has taken the form of a rat, who has somehow, maraculously, marked his terratory; his house, then the rat magically transforms into a human/ghost, whom has the power to change the expressions in photos... , by building the tension/suspense really slowly throughout there isnt as big a climax as the story has led us to believe. I will, however, give credit to the writer for the big dramatic discovery and the conclusion, with the welcome the crowd of people recieve. ...'they knocked loudly at the door, but there was no reply. Then burst in the door, and poured into the great dining-room'...only to discover the only person home has been hung from the ceiling... by a rat. 5 As this story was told in first person, there was nothing that made it obvious of it coming to an end. And judging from the fact that he was living to tell the story, means it has a positive ending, which leaves the reader feeling puzzled, although some may have prefered a more shocking ending. Being so completely petrified the character surrenders to his fears and attempts to escape the phantom coach, which he had witnessed something so unbelievably terrifying, they felt they would rather commit suicide than let 'it' get them. These quote(s) give the story a definite sense of being finished: '...i will pass over the scene that ensued...''... the place of my fall, i need scarcelly say, was precicely that at which a frightful accident had happened to the north mail nine years before...''...others may form what conclusions they please-i know that twenty years ago i was the fouurth inside passenger in th phantom coach...' ...read more.

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