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In The Cone the narration is in third person. This gives the impression that the characters are almost detached from the story, they could die at any moment. In parts where Raut is tense, you go into his mind

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Introduction

The Cone Section In The Cone the narration is in third person. This gives the impression that the characters are almost detached from the story, they could die at any moment. In parts where Raut is tense, you go into his mind. The visits into Raut's mind are usually filled with questions: "Did the man mean to take the thing coolly? Did he after all know? How long had he been in the room?" This shows his confusion and fear. Raut sounds the same as wrought, this shows that H G Wells has designed Raut to be on edge- wrought nerves. Much personification is made for the furnace, Horrock's pet: "[regarding the furnace] I've a particular fancy for HIM" This increases the idea that this thing could easily go out of control. ...read more.

Middle

A metaphor is made about ghosts on the molten iron eddies: "...an incessant succession of ghosts coming up from the black and red eddies..." This gives the impression that many people may have died in this place. When Horrocks in killing Raut he shouts "Boil! Boil! Boil!" this triple alliteration technique is a good way of emphasising and making something more dramatic, it is still used much by modern politicians in their speeches. The excessive use of exclamation marks adds to the created emphasis and tension. The main colours used are reds and oranges and the night is described as hot: "The night was hot and overcast, the sky red..." This and Raut's eventual death makes the story line particularly Hellish, arousing the ever more potent science vs. ...read more.

Conclusion

He is very aggressive towards Raut; he grips, clenches and twists many of Raut's limbs. Also is the incident on the train tracks, where Raut believes Horrocks is holding him on the line in front of the on coming train. Horrocks, however, pulls him in at the last minute saying "I wouldn't have had you run over then for the world." The then adds to ambiguity, entailing the possibility that Horrocks will get him later and keeping the reader guessing. Horrocks does repent after the momentary rush of blood in which he throws Raut into the furnace: "God have mercy upon me!" "O God! What have I done?" This could give the impression that, though industrialisation is victorious, it will regret the destruction of the country and the traditional, rural way of life. Harry Roper 10SR ...read more.

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