• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

In the extract where Pip a boy from a very humble background meets Miss Havisham a rich but eccentric lady, Dickens wants the reader to feel sympathetic towards Pip. How does he make us feel this way?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Name: Musangu Muchunga Form:10ck Coursework First Draft Question 1: In the extract where Pip a boy from a very humble background meets Miss Havisham a rich but eccentric lady, Dickens wants the reader to feel sympathetic towards Pip. How does he make us feel this way? Extract two talks about Pip, an under privileged boy, who is referred to as a common labouring boy. He enters a large house, with large rooms, well-lighted wax candles, and all the jewels. This seems to leave Pip in awe because he comes from a lower class were such expensive material things are not at all common. When Pip meets Miss Havisham, right away the difference in class can be noticed. ...read more.

Middle

Estella feels because she is of higher social status she does not need to play cards with Pip. She refers to him as a common labouring boy, the readers would sympathise with Pip, because the writer makes him seem inadequate. When asked what he plays, Pip answers; "nothing but beggar Miss" because he comes from a poor background such games are not common to Pip. Estella does not show any appreciation of Pips presence by verbally describing Pips hands as being coarse and thick boots. Pip was subdued as a result of being told that he has coarse hands, Pip further states that Estella's contemplation for him was so strong, he started to feel unwelcome in their household. ...read more.

Conclusion

At this point the reader feels that Estella is a cold and ruthless person, were as Pip is a more caring person who feels compassion for other people and Estella does not. The writer makes it very obvious that Pip was at the mercy of Mrs Havisham and Estella, because of their difference in social status. They made Pip feel insignificant, to the point were they brought him down to tear. They started to make him feel unwelcome, they made him feel as if he was not good enough to eat at the same table as them. They made him feel inferior, Estella could not look at him when giving him his food, and when offered the food Pip was not to eat at the table, he was forced to eat somewhere else were they did not have to see him. 1 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Great Expectations section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Great Expectations essays

  1. How does Dickens make us feel sorry for Pip? Look at the opening scene ...

    The symbolism shows this as it is faded and yellow but was not before showing previous innocense. She was also very bitter and twisted in the way she acted to Pip, as she was so vengeful for revenge to anyone hence why she adopted Estella and invited Pip to her house.

  2. Dickens wants the reader to feel sympathetic towards Pip. How is this achieved? The ...

    Estella is a beautiful girl who is of the same age as Pip, as well as being his one desirable love throughout the whole story. Despite Estella continuously calling Pip 'boy', criticizing him and reminding him of his lower

  1. How does Dickens make us feel for Pip?

    Pip enters a large room, he very observant. For example he mentions, 'pretty large room, well lighted with wax candles.' The description creates a mental image in our minds of where he is, immediately we empathise with Pip. A young boy, sent to a strangers house where he sees everything that he hopes to have.

  2. In the extract where Pip, a boy from a very humble background meets Miss ...

    Although at this point of the extract we have hope for Pip, that he will please Havisham and she will take to him like she did to Estella. When Pip enters he finds the house is 'well lighted with wax candles'.

  1. In the extract where Pip, a boy from a very humble background meets Miss ...

    "This boy's fortune may be made by his going to Miss Havisham's." Already, Pip has something to achieve before he even gets to know Miss Havisham properly. When Pip goes to Miss Havisham's, he sees the gates, and does not know what to do.

  2. In the extract where Pip, a boy from a very humble background meets Miss ...

    "No glimpse of daylight" gives the room a gloomy sensation. "Had lost its lustre and was faded yellow" reflects the dullness and loss of happiness. "Had shrunk to skin and bone" create a sense of demise and lifelessness. The vocabulary used in these descriptions of the room provide a sad

  1. Great Expectations - This essay is about a boy called Pip who is from ...

    In chapter two Pip says that his sister had bought him up by hand. Pips sister says to Pip 'if it wasn't for me you'd have been in the churchyard a long time ago'. This is true because in those days (Dickens times) orphaned children had to look after themselves.

  2. "Miss Havisham is a memorable and frightening character. Do you think this is what ...

    He does not have many privileges, as well as physical objects, because he lives in such a poor household. This greatly affects his lifestyle and childhood. Joe Gargery, who cares for Pip, seems like a father and brother for pip, and takes the role of father in Pips life, due to the death of Pips birth father.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work