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In the Merchant of Venice explore Shakespeare's presentation as a villain and as a victim.

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Introduction

Jack Cooper 2nd draft In the Merchant of Venice explore Shakespeare's presentation as a villain and as a victim. Shakespeare presents shylock, in the Merchant of Venice as a villain and as a victim. In this essay I will explain my views and thoughts. I believe that Shakespeare presents Shylock as a victim just as well as a villain. one of the main ways we see this, is Antonio's attitude towards Shylock. In 1.3 it says in the text "rheum upon my beard." This shows us the lack of respect to Shylock, but in the same scene Shakespeare presents Shylock as a villain by saying in the text "now you need my help!." ...read more.

Middle

Shakespeare also displays Shylock as a villain in 3.2 when Antonio says "hear me not good Shylock," but Shylock interrupts and forcefully says " I'll have my bond, speak not against my bond, I hath sworn an oath against my bond!". This shows us that Shylock is not going to give up with his bond and has convinced himself that he will be going home with a pound of Antonio's flesh. Shakespeare gives us the feeling that Shylock is being bullied in many ways. We know this when we learn about shylocks profession. He can only do work that is put out for Jews. ...read more.

Conclusion

However, Shylock has characteristics of a villain, we can see this because Shylock must have his revenge on Antonio by not giving him any le-way with their bond, "I will have my bond, speak not against my bond!" One of the main ways Shakespeare presents Shylock as a victim is in 4.1 when Gratiano says "O be thou damn'd, incredible dog, to hold opinion with Pythagoras!" This is showing us that shylock is seen to Christians as a pagan. On the whole Shakespeare shows us in more than one way that Shylock is a victim as well as a villain. But he mainly presents shylock as a victim in my point of view. I believe this because Shakespeare shows Shylock as a villain 4 times and as a victim 5 times. By Jack Cooper ...read more.

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