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In the novel 'Great Expectations', the central character Pip has many expectations thrust upon him by others, as well as himself, from a very early age. What do we discover about these expectations and the characters who 'demand' great things of Pip?

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Introduction

In the novel 'Great Expectations', the central character Pip has many expectations thrust upon him by others, as well as himself, from a very early age. What do we discover about these expectations and the characters who 'demand' great things of Pip and does he live up to the expectations of himself and others? In the novel 'Great Expectations' the writer, Charles Dickens expresses in expectations for the main character, Pip. This essay will explain these expectations and will see if pip meets them. The first person that has expectations is Pip, his own expectations. As a child he expects to work for Joe Gargery (Pip's sisters husband) as a blacksmith, 'I always knew I would be apprenticed to Joe as soon as I was old enough, and so I used to spend most of the day helping him in the forge.' He is happy to work with Joe, as Joe protects him and is very kind to Pip. For a while Pip lived up to these expectations. ...read more.

Middle

He expects Pip to become a gentleman and someone that he never became, 'I've made you a gentleman of you! You see, I promised myself that all the money I earned out there in Australia should go to you! I'm not a gentleman myself, and I didn't go to school, but I've got you, Pip! And look what gentleman you are!' as Abel never became a gentleman or went to school he expects Pip to become and do these things. Pip tried to live to these expectations as best as he could. Next there is Mrs. Joe Gargery. She has very high expectations of Pip. As she has raised him up by hand she is very hard on Pip as he tries to do his best to keep her happy. She puts pressure on him and makes him feel guilty because she says, 'If I hadn't brought you up, you'd be in the churchyard with our parents. You'll send me to the churchyard one day! ...read more.

Conclusion

He lives up to playing with Estella and he does live up to marrying her and becoming more than friends. In the novel Estella also has expectations of Pip as when they first meet she wants to play but is discussed of the way he looks and what he is wearing, 'With this boy! But he's a common working boy!' and she also says, 'What coarse hands this boy has! And what thick boots!' I think she is trying to make out that she is worth more and deserves more than a 'common working boy'. She tries to make him feel unwanted but at the same time she expects him to try hard at making her like him, ' You've always loved Estella. It's lucky that you seem to have been chosen to marry her. Does she, er, admire you?' Herbert says this to Pip. But deep down Pip knows that she never may love him. In conclusion Pip does have many expectations and he knows this, 'I have great expectations, I know.' In the end Pip does his best to live to these expectations and to make everyone happy. Mira Kudiarskyj 10GS Great Expectations coursework ...read more.

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