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In the play Romeo and Juliet by Shakespeare, there are many different forms of and attitudes towards love and marriage.

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Introduction

In the play Romeo and Juliet by Shakespeare, there are many different forms of and attitudes towards love and marriage. These include, the courtly love shown by Romeo for Rosaline with no expectations, which was easily replaced by his impulsive love he later shows for Juliet. It is also a very common thing to find attitudes expressed towards love and marriage in a much less romantic way, such as those from the Nurse and Lady Capulet whilst attempting to persuade Juliet to marry County Paris whom she had not met. The audience are also shown Benvolio and Mercutio's more robust and rough perception of love. At the beginning of the play, Romeo is shown to the audience as lovesick and somewhat depressed. 'Many a morning hath he there been seen, With tears augmenting the fresh morning's dew,'(Act1 Scene1) Romeo's character is also shown, in his first dialogue (Act1 Scene1) to be a quite romantic person, as, to start with, he is in love with someone who cannot return these feelings, 'She hath Dian's wit, And in strong proof of chastity...' ...read more.

Middle

Romeo also is quite quick to react as though they know everything about each other, in that, he goes, straight after meeting her, to Friar Laurence to talk about marrying her, this is very impulsive. It is quite clear, however, that Juliet is slightly more cautious as she does not run the risk of being seen with him whenever she can avoid it, such as, later on, in Act2 Scene4, when she does not go to meet with Romeo, she sends the Nurse as a messenger. The idea of fate is used a lot in this play, for instance, the idea of Romeo and Juliet being 'star-crossed lovers' is very much to do with fate, 'From forth the fatal loins of these two foes, A pair of star-cross'd lovers take their life:'(Prologue) This is to say that, the children of Capulet and Montague were fated from birth to love each other and then to kill themselves, as though they were helpless to stop it. ...read more.

Conclusion

Obviously, Juliet looks for the option in which she can, not marry County Paris, to please her parents and her religion, and Friar Laurence helps her with this, 'Take thou this vial, ... And this distilled liquid drink thou off,' This shows that in the society in which this is set one would prefer to pretend to be dead than to face the humiliation of being 'outcast' from your family. I think that Shakespeare was trying to convey several different messages with the ending. In the prologue it mentions that they were star crossed lovers, which means that they were doomed by fate from the start, and even though so much planning had gone into the scheme in which they were to 'beat fate' they still did not stand a chance. This is to say; no matter how hard you try, you cannot beat fate. Another message is that, if Juliet had just told her family the worst they would have done is disown her and nobody would have had to die. One last message is that a faulty messenger can lead to tragedy. ...read more.

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