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In the play, 'The Devil's Disciple' by George Bernard Shaw, the playwright shows a lot of conflict between the 'good' and 'bad'. In Act 1, Scene 1, he conflicts the behaviour of Mrs Dudgeon and Anthony Anderson in many ways.

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Introduction

Eleanor Grimwood The Devil's Disciple In the play, 'The Devil's Disciple' by George Bernard Shaw, the playwright shows a lot of conflict between the 'good' and 'bad'. In Act 1, Scene 1, he conflicts the behaviour of Mrs Dudgeon and Anthony Anderson in many ways. Starting with Mrs Dudgeon's first line, it is spoken "sharply." In the stage directions, Mrs Dudgeon "buries her face in her hands, as it is her duty as a widow to be overcome by grief", suggesting she is not at all overcome by grief, so possibly, Shaw's intent was that she cried overdramatically when it is performed on stage. The first impression of Anderson is that he is "shrewd, genial..." "With something of authority of his profession in his bearing." Other words used are "sensible...strong, healthy...keen, cheerful...no doubt an excellent parson..." Shaw obviously thinks a great deal of him, respecting him. He does not say anything bad about him. ...read more.

Middle

This shows she is bitter and not loving at all. She is "greatly relieved" when told her "good" husband didn't see her "bad" son. Although she then "sneers" when told he was greatly touched and impressed by his brother's awful death. Although she is a "good" Christian, she seems to feel no remorse at all for her brother in laws death. Anderson, being the real good Christian, loses his calmness for the first time, breaking off "to demand with some indignation." He then tells her of Richard's "wicked message" saying he would stand by his "wicked" uncle, standing against his "good" parents, in this world and the next Shaw is showing that Anderson, the supposedly more religious one, states that it is not in their hands, when Mrs Dudgeon, the "good" Christian, says that Richard will be punished for it, in both worlds. "...The wicked shall be punished." While Anderson praises Timothy, "Richard's earthly father has been merciful to him..." ...read more.

Conclusion

She is bitter and not "good" and that is the realization and the question she asks herself, deep deep down. Shaw is showing that she contains a lot inside her. The contrast that is showing is that Anderson has nothing to hide. She turns from him "brooding over her wrongs..."her bitterness is shown most clear when asked of the absence of his influence on her. "When you married for love. Now you are answered." In this part of the scene, I think Shaw is showing that although Anderson had an "altogether secular authority" and "...perhaps a little apologetically conscious of getting on better with it than a sound Presbyterian ought," he is a good mad and knows what is "good" and "bad." Mrs Dudgeon however, is a "good" woman but is bitter and enclosed in her pain of being forced in a marriage to a man she did not love, and she doesn't know anything about right and wrong. That is the main difference. "Yes: I am answered." ...read more.

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