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In the two stories I am studying; 'Her Turn' by D. H. Lawrence and 'To Please His Wife' by Thomas Hardy, both writers deal with the pressure that lack of money can cause in a marriage, in tow different situations.

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Introduction

Both stories deal with the pressure that lack of money can cause in a marriage. Compare the way in which Thomas Hardy and D. H. Lawrence portray relationships between men and women: In the two stories I am studying; 'Her Turn' by D. H. Lawrence and 'To Please His Wife' by Thomas Hardy, both writers deal with the pressure that lack of money can cause in a marriage, in tow different situations. The first story, 'To Please His Wife' by Thomas Hardy, is written at the turn of the 20th Century. The story is of a mysterious stranger, who turns up in Havenpool Town one Sunday afternoon. He turns out to have once been a member of the local parish, a seaman, who narrowly escaped a shipwreck, Captain Shadrach Jolliffe. He talks first with the townsmen whom he once knew, then his attention turns to two girls, who he recognizes as Emily Hanning and Joanna Phippard. The story then tells of how Emily and Shadrach Jollife get closer and closer until they fall in love with one another - "Emily Hanning lost her heart to the sailor" which begins the courtship between Shadrach and Emily. ...read more.

Middle

Now with a second strike in place, she was determined to claim it from him. Although both stories are different in situation, they are similar in content. Both the wives of the two men involved want the money from their husbands for the same kind of reasons. Joanna Jolliffe, after marrying Shadrach takes up a grocers shop, when her mother dies, as she won't allow him to go back to sea. Their business crashes and burns, as Shadrach isn't cut out for the job. He is a seaman. He isn't "endowed with the narrow shrewdness necessary for developing a retail business". Joanna demands more money, not for need, as they aren't stuck for money yet, but for greed, as since she married Shadrach, Emily has also married - a wealthy merchant / trader, who makes her rich. Emily is very happier, perhaps happier than Joanna - "Emily declared that she had never supposed that she could live to be so happy", so she is jealous. ...read more.

Conclusion

She claims he should give her a percentage of what he is getting, but he defies her saying "Tha's got plenty o' money as tha can use". She gives up, eventually. This is where Mr Radford differs from Shadrach. As this is his second marriage, he has quite obviously gained experience from his first marriage as to the female devious ways. He resists her. Mrs Radford however, then plays her 'joker'. She goes out to the shops and realising that her husbands only argument is that she already has money, she decides to do something about it. Now that she is out of money, the only thing left for Mr Radford to do is hand over his pay. I think, in conclusion to this comparison, that the two authors portray both relationships between man and woman in a humorous way. They portray the man as being controlled by his wife. Shadrach, who has no visible will of his own ends up obeying his wife, even though he suffers for it. Mr Radford is simply beaten at his own game by his wife. They portray the wives as the devious manipulative women who always get their way. ...read more.

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