• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

In What Ways Could this Novel be Considered as a Feminist Text? Consider the Role of Women in the Society Portrayed in this novel "Jane Eyre".

Extracts from this document...


In What Ways Could this Novel be Considered as a Feminist Text? Consider the Role of Women in the Society Portrayed in this novel "Jane Eyre". According to the dictionary feminist means "Supporter of women's claims to be given rights equal to those of men". Jane Eyre was written in a time when women in positions like Jane's were left with few options. Jane had to work to support herself, as she possessed no money of her own, yet her rank in society prevented her from doing many occupations. One of the main options was to become a governess to a child from a wealthy family. The Reed family was openly against Jane and was quite happy to send her off to Lowood where she would spend many years with little food and poor clothing. At the beginning of the novel Mrs. Reed telling Jane to go away from the rest of the family "Be seated somewhere; and until you can speak pleasantly remain silent". Mrs. Reed showed in the opening pages how she disliked Jane and this makes the reader sympathetic towards Jane. Jane often has passionate outbursts when she feels things are unfair, for example when she tells Mrs. ...read more.


For example when Jane tells Mr. Rochester that she will not be his mistress she says " Mr. Rochester, I no more assign this fate to you than I grasp at it for myself... You will forget me before I forget you." This shows even though she loves him she can stand up for herself. Another example is when Jane believes he loves Miss Ingram instead of her, "Do you think that because I am poor, obscure, plain, and little, I am soulless and heartless? You think wrong!" That speech would have taken Jane a lot of courage to say as she loves Mr. Rochester but she does not want her feelings to be played with. When Miss Ingram found out that Mr. Rochester was worth less than she thought she declined the offer of marriage. Mr. Rochester explains this " I caused a rumour to reach her that my fortune was worth a third of what was supposed, and after that I presented myself to see the result; it was coldness both from her and her mother." This shows how women were driven by money and improving their social class and did not marry for love a lot of the time. ...read more.


Bronte uses language that is very descriptive in the way she describes people and places. For example: "Miss Miller was more ordinary; ruddy in complexion, though of a careworn countenance." In this line we can understand what she looks like at first glance and a bit about her personality. She uses this style of writing to show the reader how the appearance of people is what we see first and how assumptions can be made about the person on looks alone. Her descriptive writing makes it easy for us to get a clear image of the surroundings and the characters in the novel. In this novel the reader can see how money drove people like Master Reed who became "such a dissipated young man" according to Bessie and Miss Ingram to make important decisions in life. Bronte makes statements about women's lives throughout the text but she does it subtly. When Jane thinks about her growing love for Mr. Rochester she realises that society will never let them marry " I understand the language of his countenance and movements, though rank and wealth sever us widely." Bronte says through Jane how unfair this society is that people cannot marry for love alone but must marry into their own class as well. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Charlotte Bronte section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Charlotte Bronte essays

  1. Compare and Contrast the Characters of Rochester and St. John Rivers

    Rochester and St. John, Charlotte Bronte uses a dark and light comparison to show that a person's appearance does not always match their character. When looking at St. John's appearance, you see the ideal, fair-complexioned man. He is gorgeous, tall, decently-dressed, and a parson.

  2. Jane Eyre - How has the character changed throughout the novel?

    Brocklehurst, she might not have set herself against them, but as it is, she has felt immediately that he must not have the right of it. The second main stage of Jane's life is her time at Thornfield as a governess.

  1. Show clearly through reference to the novel, the development of Jane's character in Charlotte ...

    Jane was told of what happened, of the great fire, in which Bertha Mason died, and Mr Rochester was badly injured. She then travels to Ferndean, another of Mr Rochester's residence, where he was staying. Mr Rochester and Jane meet again, and admit their feelings for each other 'all my

  2. Jane Eyre - In what ways is Jane different from the other women in ...

    Jane meets Helen, when she is sent to Lowood Institution, a charitable-school. One day Helen is dismissed is from her history class in disgrace and sent to stand in the middle of the large schoolroom. "She neither wept nor blushed, composed, though grave, she stood, the centre mark of all eyes."

  1. Bront portrays Jane Eyre as an untypical heroine. Examine Bront's language use, structure and ...

    What separates Jane Eyre from other novels of the time is that Bront� merely presented her ideas through the first person narrative of Jane. This allows the reader to make up his or her own mind. Other novelists would often interrupt their plot to preach their ideals through the authorial voice.

  2. By Looking Closely At The Central Relationship, Consider To What Extent Jane Eyre and ...

    Therefore, the fact that the tragedies are the prime cause of the couples living happy, fulfilled lives afterwards suggests that both novels conform to the conventions of the romance genre of having romantic endings. But this is to a lesser degree than some romance novels where there are no tragedies and the couples live a perfect life.

  1. Attitudes assignment- a class divided. Social Experiment in a primary school class to ...

    It just seems that the experiment with the adults did not impact as greatly as the one with the children. An adult is "meant to" be mature and strong. They are "meant to" withstand criticism. That's the way they would felt.

  2. Choose three episodes in the novel "Jane Eyre" by Charlotte Bronte, spanning her childhood ...

    This episode begins by revealing more about Georgina's character. To Georgina Jane is nothing but a servant. Georgina is well dressed and had many objects in her possession yet Jane has nothing despite Mrs Reed's promises. Georgina's treatment of Jane clearly demonstrates that even children are aware of class differences.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work