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In what ways did the Romantic poets capture the readers' attention throughout the poems?

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Introduction

In what ways did the Romantic poets capture the readers' attention through their poetry? Romantic poets used many different forms of writing techniques in order to attract attention towards their work. In the poems 'London', 'Ozymandias' and 'the Sick Rose' the respective poets each use their own styles to do this, including many hidden meanings and metaphors in their work to puzzle and intrigue the reader, which 200 years ago, and still today, would have been a successful way to gain this attention. The attacks on the industrial revolution and its negative effects on the country are rife within these poems, and it's these attacks which capture the readers imagination, as many of the audience would have see and heard about the effects first hand, and relate to the poems topic from their own experiences gaining the work much attention and consideration. Each poet employs their own techniques in the development of their poems in order to grab the readers' attention. As romanticists, spontaneity and personal experiences play important roles in their poems. London, by William Blake uses this technique immediately, 'I wander thro' each charter'd street' beginning his poem; the readers attention drawn to this style and form of writing, as it's spontaneous and exciting. ...read more.

Middle

The Sick Rose, likewise, can be interpreted in a number of ways - one accepted theory being that the rose symbolizes Britain being eaten from the inside out by the consequences of the polluting industrial revolution. Blake sums up this revolution as an 'invisible worm that fly's in the night' and it's the 'crimson joy' that is all good and pure: the nature, the farms, the land - and it's all been consumed by the hungry industry, described in the circumstance as 'thy dark, secret love that thy life destroy'. It's an interesting view to take by Blake, and as a result it's something interesting to read about. Blake continues this idea in London, as his negativity and dislike towards the city is described with vicious words and phrases, emphasising every bad point of the highly industrialised city: 'Blackening church appals' and 'Chimney sweepers cry' being just a few examples of how the industrial revolution, and the soot and the smog, is contaminating the lives and well being that, in the opinion of the writer, should belong to nature. He goes on to explain the effects of the revolution on the minds of the population, 'every cry of every man..' ...read more.

Conclusion

To the more intelligent reader, the face value meaning of the poem will be forgotten for the higher, metaphorical levels of the poem, ranging from biblical to industrial interpretations. In a way, it is this choice given to the reader that helps to attract attention towards the poem, as they can decide for themselves using their own methods of thinking exactly what the meaning of the poem is. In reflection, the Romantic poets of the 1800's were all about a style and purpose of writing - to deliver their own messages and ideas across to their audiences, in an interesting and creative manner, which would have captured their attention quite successfully. In these three poems discussed, the poets use their own techniques and methods to create an easy and interesting poem to read, although many of the seemingly harmless images of the poems were actually facades for darker meanings. These thoughts and opinions on nature or the lack of it, prostitution and industrialisation and its negative effects gave the audience, who likewise would have experienced these things first hand, something to connect with - and as a result relate to the poem. These were just few of the ways in which the Romantic poets managed to capture their readers' attention. ?? ?? ?? ?? Will Seymour 9/20/07 English Coursework \ ...read more.

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