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In what ways does Mary Shelley make you sympathise with the monster in 'Frankenstein'?

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Introduction

In what ways does Mary Shelley make you sympathise with the monster in 'Frankenstein'? In 1797 Mary Shelley was born. She was the daughter of two radical figures in a fast-changing world. Mary Shelley, the author of Frankenstein, or 'The Modern Prometheus' lived in a strange and ever changing world. She grew up and lived surrounded by many radical people, which gave her, I suspect, some of the inspiration for her most famous novel. Polidori for example wrote 'The Vampyre' in 1819. She tasted independence early, but even though she lived in London, the centre of political radicalism, she spent a lot of time away in Scotland with friends. Here she developed the creative side to herself, where she became the 'creative, wilful heroine'. There are also some other factors that could have affected Shelley around the time she wrote Frankenstein. One of these factors could have been Science. At the time there were many 'discoveries' being made in science. Shelley along with many people with fascinated by the discoveries being made at the time, but she also was acutely aware 'Of the inherent dangers of the scientific quest which could so easily sacrifice humane means, perhaps humanity itself, in the quest for knowledge and power.' ...read more.

Middle

The monster hopes he can build a friendship with the old man and be accepted by the rest of the family. Things do not go well for the monster, and just as he gets into conversation with the old man, Felix, the son of De Lacey walks in and sees him. He is, yet again judged on appearance, and it is assumed by Felix that he must be there to harm his father. Therefore, on instinct Felix attacks: - 'Felix darted forward, and with supernatural force tore me from his father, to whose knees I clung: in a transport of fury, he dashed me to the ground, and struck me violently with a stick.' Again the monster has suffered cruelty, and been cast out of society as a reject. At this point in the novel we are very sympathetic to the monster, which seems to be alone in the world, with no one to care for his needs, even a conversation with another being. We now see that the monster is aware of his difference, his 'monstrosity', from observing the De Lacey's. He knows he is different and it is proven to him on the entrance of Felix and the others, on their entrance into the house. ...read more.

Conclusion

Frankenstein goes back to Geneva to start this project, but in Chapter 20, when Victor finally begins his work he comes face to face with the monster, and it reminds him of the 'monstrosity' he has created. He refuses to build the female, and the monster once again swears his revenge on Victor. 'It is well, I go; but remember, I shall be with you on your wedding-night.' These words are to shape the end of the novel for Victor and the monster. On his wedding night, Victor sends Elizabeth off while he waits for the monster to come for him. He then hears the scream of Elizabeth, and he realises that the monster meant he would kill his bride, not him. Shortly afterwards Victor returns home, but his father dies of grief. He has also lost Clerval, to the monster's wrath. He swears to exact his revenge and pursues the monster. He nearly catches the monster, but a split in the ice separates them, and the monster gets away. Victor is then taken on board a ship, by Walton.The last time the two meet, creator and creation on board the ship. The monster feels he has finally got his revenge, and he jumps from the ship, soon to die. 'He sprang from the cabin-window, as he said this, upon the ice-raft which lay close to the vessel. He was soon borne away by the waves, and lost in darkness and distance.' ...read more.

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