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"In what ways does Miller succeed in making the moment when Proctor tears up his confession particularly dramatic?"

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Introduction

"In what ways does Miller succeed in making the moment when Proctor tears up his confession particularly dramatic?" Miller succeeds in making the moment when Proctor tears up his confession particularly dramatic by making the situation that Proctor is in an outwardly simple decision, though his life depends on it Miller adds a certain irony to the situation, however as Danforth claims (after Proctor says he will confess, but the confession is a lie) that he 'will not deal in lies', when in fact, he has been dealing in lies through the entire play. Following the hard decision between living with a bad name or being murdered with a good one, Proctor destroys his confession which leaves the characters who are present, and the audience, in shock. ...read more.

Middle

What makes this part of the play so dramatic is that just before the scene where Proctor tears up his confession, Danforth is trying his best to convince Proctor to sign the confession, but this just adds to Proctor's anger. In Act Four, where Proctor is signing his confession, the play is made more dramatic than most previous parts of the play as he knows that he is lying and he thinks that all he has to do is tell Danforth and Hathorne of his sins and he will be left alone with his good name and his life. When Proctor finds out that it must be written he is horrified, but he is even more upset when he finds out that the confession was to be posted on the church doors for the whole village to see. ...read more.

Conclusion

Proctor says "Because it is my name! Because I cannot have another in my life"; this shows that Proctor feels much against having his confession posted on the church as that means he is signing his good name away. Elizabeth Proctor serves as the moral conscience in this act of The Crucible. It is Elizabeth who puts forward the most important arguments for Proctor accepting his own death, despite her stated wish that she wants her husband to choose life rather than death. This could be interpreted as another sign of Elizabeth's cold personality, as she remains apparently more concerned about hypothetical ethical principles than her husband's life; Danforth even questions whether Elizabeth does have any sense of tenderness. Ross Saunders English ...read more.

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