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In what ways does William Shakespeare's presentation of Capulet In Act 3 Scene 5 enhances the effectiveness of Romeo and Juliet

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Introduction

In what ways does William Shakespeare's presentation of Capulet In Act 3 Scene 5 enhances the effectiveness of Romeo and Juliet There are many ways, in which Shakespeare's presentation of Capulet in Act 3 scene 5 has enhanced the effectiveness of Romeo and Juliet for the audience. He does this through structure, which speeds up the scene, and through the strong language he uses to reveal the 'real' Capulet. Also he involves the historical context about Capulet and the characterisation of him, which makes the audience evaluate him. In the play Rome and Juliet the 'star-crossed lover', from the two rival families, the Capulet and the Montague, who are 'caught-up' in an 'ancient grudge'. This 'breaks to new mutiny', thought not only their inevitable deaths but also those of others around them. In this scene Romeo and Juliet have consummated their marriage, have now set in motion and unstoppable train of events because no divorce was allowed and Romeo has been banished to Mantua. The audience experience the contrast from gentleness and tranquillity to rage and violence. Shakespeare has shaped the scene by developing Juliet's hopelessness. He does this by contrast. She changes from being hopeful in the beginning, when she says 'thou we shall meet', to a hopeless character towards the end. ...read more.

Middle

Also he threatens Juliet by saying that, 'I will drag thee hurdle thither'. The image of the 'hurdle' makes the audience feel that Capulet perceives Juliet as a prisoner, which in fact she has no choice. It is ironic that the result of this threat results to her death and it is an example of dramatic irony because the audience knows that she is going to die but Capulet does not. Her father, continues to compares his daughter to a rotting flesh by describing her as a, 'green sickness carrion'. This image of an anaemic lifeless corpse is further emphasised by the image 'sickness', which shows Capulet's thoughts that Juliet is infecting the family. These images demonstrate Capulet's opinion that Juliet is less human, which reveals his true identity, from a concerned loving father to a volatile. The audience would react to him as a cold-hearted man and a bully because he wants his own way and does not care about other people's feelings, including those of his own daughter. Capulet's characterisation at various times in the play differs, when he was at the party, being quite jovial with the guests, 'Ladies that have their toes unplagued with corns' and when he was roaring at Juliet. ...read more.

Conclusion

This has been shown, by Juliet's refusal when she disobeyed her father. The issues Shakespeare has tried to raise and ask in his play, that men and women should be treated equally with respect and that arrange marriage can affect lives, which it had done in the play. A sixteenth century audience would have been shocked when they had watched this play because it showed some traditions being broken. This might seem a conventional family to some of the audience because Capulet has more power over his wife and towards the family due to the fact that he is a man, and that he is trying to arrange a marriage. However to a twenty-first century audience this would be completely unacceptable in most society because today's society has supposedly progressed. In this play Shakespeare's presentation of Capulet in Act 3 scene 5 has enhanced the effectiveness of Romeo and Juliet on the audience. He does this by making the use of structure, which motivates the play and through the language, which reveals Capulet's hidden character. The usage of historical context shows Shakespeare's purposes of this play, which was to encourage the audience to consider the lifestyle of sixteenth century England and how society operated. I think that Shakespeare has written this play to signify the dominating powers of the parents against their child; this reflects the sixteenth century customs. ?? ?? ?? ?? Amdadur Rahman 10/O Miss Biggs ...read more.

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