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In What Ways Has Arthur Miller Made Act Three Of The Crucible So Dramatically Intense?

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Introduction

In What Ways Has Arthur Miller Made Act Three Of ?The Crucible? So Dramatically Intense? Act Three of Arthur Miller?s ?The Crucible? is a build up to one of the most dramatic scenes of the play. The play is set in Salem: a historical village known for people accusing others of witches. The play revolves around this point. Consequently, there were many trials to try and attempt to prove that the people were actually witches, with death being the most common punishment if found guilty. The play was written in 1953, a time when the Americans thought that the Russian communists were spying on them; this led to what became known as McCarthyism, Miller?s inspiration for this play. McCarthyism was an act to deport all communists back to Russia. Miller could have written ?The Crucible? to make an allegory and portray his views on this and using the witches? representing the communists, could have wanted his American audience to know that they are not that different. Arthur Miller also wrote The Crucible to explain to the US people about the tactics ?if you're not with us your against us? of McCarthy, who forced a hunt against Americans who were communists. Americans were afraid of communists so he wished to express his views because he was also accused of being a communist. ...read more.

Middle

As for the lighting in the play for this particular scene, I would have light coming through a window shining onto Mary Warren and Parris as they are the two most important people in the scene. This would highlight them as the main characters so the audience would focus their attention on them and they could see Mary?s expression. I would also have slow music that is gaining pace until the point when Mary says ?I- cannot? (Act Three, page 86) then there are a few moments silence and a murmur breaks out in the court. This would build up tension so the audience knows something pivotal is going to happen. Therefore it will still come as a surprise but no tension is lost within the audience. The second most dramatic part of Act Three is the ?yellow bird? episode. The ?yellow bird? episode is where Abigail pretends to see a yellow bird on the ceiling of the courtroom and the other girls see it as well, in addition to that, they start to repeat what Mary Warren says. Abigail says ?Why do you come, yellow bird?? (Act Three, page 92) This proves that Abigail is not trustworthy and she feels that she has accomplished something, she has cleared her name at the expense of others and she feels powerful and smug. ...read more.

Conclusion

As Act Three progresses, the main characters do things that the audience have never expected, therefore they have developed their personality. For example, Abigail is not now trustworthy and because she thinks John Proctor has covered her and so she feels powerful. At the end of the Act Three we as the audience are stunned at what the characters have done. Arthur Miller has made us feel like this because in the way that he wrote it, he wanted to keep the audience on the edge of their seat and to do that he made the characters personalities at the start change throughout the play so he has controlled how the audience feel which is a very effective way to write a great play. Overall, I think that Arthur Miller successfully creates an atmosphere of tension in Act Three of ?The Crucible?. This is because he has made me go into a false sense of security with the characters, and gave me a shock at what happened at the end. This act in particular is dramatically intense because the characters personalities get bolder and therefore they become louder- because of this Miller has made an interesting read as well as a brilliant play. Miller has effectively presented his views in McCarthyism in the play as or shows that we are no different to others. However, an audience in the 1950?smay not have liked the play as they all agreed with what the senator wanted and therefore didn?t except his views on the matter. ...read more.

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