• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

In What Were They Like and Nothings Changed, both Levertov and Afrika illustrate a sense of meaning about Viet Nam and District Six by using linguistic and structural techniques.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Compare the ways poets use structure and language to convey meaning in 'What Were they Like?' and one other poem In 'What Were They Like' and 'Nothing's Changed', both Levertov and Afrika illustrate a sense of meaning about 'Viet Nam' and 'District Six' by using linguistic and structural techniques. Levertov explores the loss of the Vietnamese cultures while Afrika represents the racial divide that continues to exist even post-Apartheid. Firstly, both writers use strong language choices to demonstrate their anger towards the loss of culture and racial divide that is apparent in both areas. In 'Nothing's Changed' the poet uses words such as 'hot, white [anger}' to illustrate how frustrated he is. The anger and rage that has developed inside the protagonist has affected him both physically and emotionally. Indeed, he wants to break the barrier between the two races as he yearns for 'a stone, a bomb, to shiver down the glass'. ...read more.

Middle

The poet uses this to convey to the reader that such earth-loving people who ' [delighted] in blossom' and worked in 'paddies' have become 'silent now'. In 'Nothing's Changed, however, the reference to nature is used to make the 'white's only inn stand out'. For instance, Afrika says that the inn 'squats in the grass and weeds'. The inn itself is built upon the very foundations of District Six. The poet is suggesting that the inn is artificial and 'flares like a flag'. Furthermore, the inn is surrounded by 'incipient Port Jackson trees'. 'Incipient' suggests that the trees themselves are new. Moreover, 'Port Jackson' tries are not indigenous to District Six and have been imported from elsewhere. In addition, the poets use structure to represent meaning within the poem. In 'Nothing's Changed', anger is expressed by the protagonist as a result of the minimal change that has occurred in the lives of black people. ...read more.

Conclusion

This reflects upon the poet's message as it shows that segregation still exists within District Six and the blacks still know where they 'belong'. In 'What Were They Like', the tile poses a question to the reader and it suggests that this will be answered throughout the poem. However, it isn't because Levertov ends the poem with the question 'Who can say?' This final question reinforces how the culture has been destroyed by the American-Vietnamese war because even at the end of the poem; there is still ambiguity to whether the Vietnamese 'terraces' and 'paddies' existed or not. In conclusion, both poets express meaning to the reader by a mix of both structural and linguistic devices. One shows the segregation and racial divide between black and whites and how this has affected the development of culture within 'District Six'. On the other hand, Levertov demonstrates how culture has been lost by the destruction of 'Viet Nam'. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Comparing poems section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Comparing poems essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Compare how the past reveals feelings about a place in Nothings Changed with the ...

    5 star(s)

    The poet also uses colours such as grey and metallic in contrast to the blues and greens of the island. Grey here symbolises dull and metallic symbolises industrial and ugly. The word 'soar' almost echoes as the wild birds soaring in the island but the soar also suggests the rising sound of the cars that he can hear.

  2. Comparing Not My Business with Nothings Changed and how they demonstrate strong attitudes and ...

    destroyed and walked over, this highlights the idea of the white minority walking over the black majority. TA also used special uses of words that echo each other, for example assonance is used when the sound; "rose" in the fifth stanza is echoes at the end of stanza six; "bone".

  1. Two Scavengers and Nothings Changed both use language and layout to convey the writers ...

    that can be eaten at 'a plastic table's top.' There's a real sense of decorum or manners as instead of 'linen' whereas the working men 'wipe their fingers in your jeans' to show it's common and working class.

  2. Clash of cultures coursework

    This statement is a direct contrast to the way in which Naraian was described before: "He kicked aside the clothes impatiently, at the same time shouting at her to point out her neglect". The author creates these two very contrasting statements to highlight the dramatic change of heart Naraian has

  1. In my essay I will be comparing the two poems nothings changed by Tatamkhulu ...

    reader by saying that your hope will always rise and that it is natural in a persons life just like the tides coming in and out are natural and the sun rise and set is natural. "Did you want to see me broken bowed head lowered eyes, shoulders falling like

  2. Not My Business and 'District 6' compared.

    The poet goes on to show the ignorance of some of the people, 'What business of mine is it so long they don't take the yam from my savouring mouth.' The narrator's selfishness is shown by the mention of 'yam' which represents his food, comfortable home and self-occupied lifestyle, despite mentioning what happened to Akanni.

  1. Both Nothing's Changed and Two Scavengers deal with social injustices, however, there are some ...

    he is "reliving" or if he is speaking of the present day.The next and final sentence of the poem has the writer commenting that, "Nothing's Changed".

  2. Compare and contrast Charge of The Light Brigade(TM) and Dulce et Decorum Est(TM)

    Again Tennyson is attempting to prepare us for the battle that's awaiting them. He makes use of a rhetorical question in the second stanza; "Was there a man dismay'd?" Tennyson is aiming to make us feel as if we're there with the men having first hand experience of the catastrophe that was about to befall them..

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work