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Indroduction and dramatization of of the main theme in act 1 of the Crucible

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Introduction

"How does Miller introduce and dramatise the main theme of the play in the first act? How does this act relate to later tragic events in the crucible?" The entirety of the play 'The Crucible' revolves around: reputation, personal grudges, revenge, guilt, loss of innocence and dangerous implications, especially in Act 1. Due to this, I will analyse and elaborate upon the ideas by the playwright 'Arthur Miller' in this act. This was a true account of the terrifying era whereby a story of witchcraft destroyed a flourishing society. Furthermore this play typifies the predicaments still present in the world; it would suggest that socially, humans have not progressed positively, otherwise advancing in technology and lifestyle etc. Arthur Miller's account of the Salem witch trials was published 264 years after the story took place; the original story was based in 1692. This period of unquestionable injustice fascinated Miller to search for the real truth and facts behind it all. After lengthy burrowing into court records retained by the Massachusetts crime courts, Miller had the sufficient information to build his four-act play into a success. Later on, I will reveal how this play explores themes that are centred on evil. A word about the title; a 'Crucible' is a scientific instrument or vessel, in which metals are heated to extract and eradicate impurities. ...read more.

Middle

"She makes me drink chicken blood," Abigail confessed when interrogated about the assembly in the woods. Tituba was from Barbados and was brought to Salem because of the slave trade; this automatically formed prejudice, especially because she was black. Considered inferior and unusual, Tituba was the best figure in the town to be held responsible. Also, she spoke in non-standard English which indicated Tituba had a low status in society, "There was four... I don't want kill that man." The hatred and mistreatment of 'witches' later in the play is a tragic event whereby many people paid the ultimate price. Their life. Arthur Miller dramatised the dancing in the woods to full effect; it symbolised rebellion and escape. Due to strict laws enforced by the Puritan society, the girls in the wood acted vulgarly, "drank chicken blood, naked", so indicated that they disagreed with the laws therefore decided to break them. Of course, the meeting had to be secretive, as in the event of the assembly being shame-faced; the consequence would have been extremely harsh. In addition, the dance represented 'escape' or release from the strains of the puritan lifestyle; many may have considered it dull and strenuous. However, Reverend Samuel Parris' pressure is made apparent due to his daughter's quandary. ...read more.

Conclusion

Highly evident from the dialogue, 'The Crucible' was built up of many interesting themes, all of which are of contemporary relevance. It would be easy to fathom about the people in this world that are still affected by these struggles. We only had to see the racial abuse towards black footballers, whom monkey imitations were directed at from the fans. In the zealous witch-hunts case, witches' unusual view upon lifestyle and faith was discriminated against, so the rituals had to be held secretively. Also in the modern era, we see cases of revenge splashed across newspaper front pages; the events of 9/11 (twin tower suicide bombing) was believed to be an act of revenge from the Afghans towards the USA, due the USA's previous cases of hatred and abuse. I personally believe reputation was probably one of the most significant themes; most events either improved or did the opposite to a certain person's reputation. It almost certainly is applicable today: jobs, shops, sports, music or communities portray some form of reputation, which shapes arguments for or against them. As a final thought, 'The Crucible' did not only display life in Salem, but displayed life as it were today; it is the humans' version of the 'animal kingdom' and 'where one stands is how one may live.' ?? ?? ?? ?? Mitul Dave 10SD 1 'The Crucible' English coursework ...read more.

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