• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Irony In 'Lord of the Flies'

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Irony In 'Lord of the Flies' William Golding, the author of Lord of the Flies, used irony to tell his story of a group of young British boys stranded on a deserted island. The readers can clearly spot the irony in the dialogue and Ralph, one of the main character, is also aware of the irony in his situation. The irony in the novel forces the readers to step aside and think about the hidden meanings the author is trying to express. The first example of irony occurred in chapter two. Jack says to the group of young, impressionable boys that "We've got to have rules and obey them. ...read more.

Middle

Now he realized what life on the island would really be like. There is irony in Piggy' s name. The boys hunt, kill and eat pigs on the island. Not only do they kill the pigs, they enjoy it tremendously. Piggy' s name suggests that he will be a victim of the beast. Not the beast the boys on the island fear, but the beast within each of them. The author is saying through Piggy that because they kill and eat the pigs they become the beast. Ralph prays to the adult world to send them something grownup, a sign or something. ...read more.

Conclusion

If they had been able to meet and discuss they boys would have never fleed their school and would have never been shot down, therefore avoiding ever being on the island. William Golding used irony in Lord of the Flies as a way to make the readers step back and think about what he wrote. If he had not wrote the story with ironic twists and hidden meanings many people would miss the meaning of the book. The readers would be able to finish the novel without thinking about the issues that you are meant to ponder after reading Lord of the Flies, such as evil, spirituality, society, man versus the unknown, man versus himself and many other important themes in the book. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE William Golding section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE William Golding essays

  1. Themes, Motifs, and Symbols - Themes are the fundamental concepts addressed and explored in ...

    Ralph wept for the end of innocence, the darkness of man's heart, and the fall through the air of a true, wise friend called Piggy Suddenly, Ralph looks up to see a naval officer standing over him. The officer tells the boy that his ship has come to the island after seeing the blazing fire in the jungle.

  2. Analysis of Lord of the Flies.

    The storm is also important because it washes away the bodies of Simon and the parachutist. There will now be no proof that the beast does not exist. Indeed, Jack has already made the beast into a godlike figure, attributing to it both immortality and the power to change form;

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work