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Is "Great Expectations" like a soap opera

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Is "Great Expectations" like a soap opera? Consider all that Pip went through, or just take parts, like his trial with the girl, at first, she didn't like him, and then later on in his life, she loved him. Also, what are the chances that some poor boy that no one knows ends up inheriting a huge sum of money out of the blue one day, and that the person who leaves it to him is an escaped criminal who Pip just happened to help out one day. All of these things are coincidence, and that's mostly what soap operas are based on. Let's go through the three Stages of Pip expectations to find out: 1st-He is going to be apprenticed to Joe. 2nd-He is expecting to be of upper class.... a gentlemen. 3rd-His very much lowered expectations. Many of the characters other than Pip have their own expectations as well, which makes the novel more attractive to readers because it adds other threads to the plot ,for example ,Herbert Pocket and Pip's expectatons are different and appealling. ...read more.


Magwitch is a good influence in the end. He helps Pip to a better life. After his arrival at the temple pip begins to like him and becomes a little kinder because of it.With the money he gives a partnership to Herbert. Overall, at the end of the story, he is Pip's friend. In the abridged ending is typically that of a soap opera because, Pip marries Estella. And learns to forgive and forget. Even though Estella has treated him horribly his whole life-used him and then thrown him away-he can still love her and be happy with her. The last line is made up of one syllable words (besides every) which help emphasise the young age of the victim. 2004-02-24 Added by: Christina I doubt the father is crying because he feels responsible (even though he might be), I think he is just crying because he has lost one of the most important persons of his life, and he deeply misses his presence. ...read more.


Here, his brother finally becomes HIS brother and not just a "body" or "corpse". The last line is the climax of the poem although nothing happens. We are made aware of exactly how old his brother is and it is the only time that Heaney uses a proper rhyming scheme througout the poem. This adds a double emphasis that really leaves it engraved in your mind. 2004-10-28 Added by: Lisa G. This poem is powerful because it's real. It's real because it is plain. It's plain because it doesn't probe the poet's feelings. It doesn't probe the poet's feelings because he probably wasn't aware of them. What he was aware of was what was going on around him, so this is what he described in the poem. This allows the reader to really feel the impact of the tragedy from the poet's standpoint. The enormity of the shock on Heaney can be seen from the way his brain can't fully absorb it yet. ...read more.

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