• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Is the Tragedy in Return of the Native and Wuthering Heights due to the author's presentation of the characters or social influences?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Is the Tragedy in Return of the Native and Wuthering Heights due to the author's presentation of the characters or social influences? The Return of the Native and Wuthering Heights are both novels that are centred around the theme of tragedy. The plots in both books involve mainly tragic characters and their downtrodden outcomes. The tragic storylines seem to be due to social influences rather than the way in which the authors present their characters. For example Cathy's undesired love for servant boy Heathcliff or Mrs Yeobright's family pride. An example of tragedy in Return of the Native is the death of Mrs Yeobright who dies from exhaustion when crossing the heath to settle an argument with her son Clym. This death could have been prevented if Eustacia had opened the door to Mrs Yeobright. The tragic death of Mrs Yeobright can be seen from two different view points. Some may say that the social influences caused the tragedy due to the fact that Eustacia was unable to open the door to Mrs Yeobright because Wildeve was in the house with her. In the 19th century when the book was written it would have been extremely frowned upon for a women to be alone with another man who wasn't their husband. ...read more.

Middle

Heathcliff is treated and seen as a servant in the Earnshaw household and Catherine is the lady of the house. In the Victorian times it would have seen to be wrong to marry a servant and Egdar would serve as a more suitable husband as he is wealthy. It is significant that Heathcliff begins his life as a homeless orphan on the streets of Liverpool. When Bront� composed her book, in the 1840s, the English economy was severely depressed, and the conditions of the factory workers in industrial areas like Liverpool were so appalling that the upper and middle classes feared violent revolt. Thus, many of the more affluent members of society beheld these workers with a mixture of sympathy and fear. In literature, the smoky, threatening, miserable factory-towns were often represented in religious terms, and compared to hell. The poet William Blake, writing near the turn of the nineteenth century, speaks of England's "dark Satanic Mills." Heathcliff, of course, is frequently compared to a demon by the other characters in the book. Considering this historical context, Heathcliff seems to embody the anxieties that the book's upper- and middle-class audience had about the working classes. ...read more.

Conclusion

However, she is also motivated by impulses that prompt her to violate social conventions-to love Heathcliff, throw temper tantrums, and run around on the moor. Her cruel character also causes her to treat Heathcliff bad in some parts and act as though she is far too superior to marry him. For example when she returns home from the Linton's and belittles Heathcliff. In conclusion although social influences do affect the plot of both novels it is at the end of the day the cause of the authors' presentation of the characters' personalities and actions. The uptight Victorian society had high standards when it came to social class and the proper way for a lady to act. This may be the cause of Catherine's choice of marriage or Eustacia not opening the door to Mrs Yeobright when she had another man in the house. However both Hardy and Bronte present Eustacia and Catherine as both strong and 'wild' women who often rebel against society but eventually have to conform to fit in with the times. In my opinion both authors use the characters in their novels to represent the constraints of the 19th century. ?? ?? ?? ?? Amy Dunne ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Emily Bronte section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Emily Bronte essays

  1. Social Classes in Wuthering Heights.

    (page 268 lines 14 - 25). Heathcliff tries to be with Catherine even after her death. The attraction for each other was so strong that even her marrying another man and dying in childbirth does not end the story of their love. Emily Bronte describes this passion as enduring beyond the grave, very real and unconventional.

  2. Discuss Jane Austen's use of settings in the novel Northanger Abbey, showing how this ...

    Unlike Fullerton, Bath is a real place of which Jane Austen appears to be familiar with, as places such as Pulteney Street do exist, even today. There are no parts of Bath that are explicitly described building up a good image in your head of the place, but the events

  1. Wuthering heights, Jane Eyre & Pride and Prejudice

    Although at first both characters are unhappy with the situation, Rochester makes himself agree with Jane, and Jane alternates between a feeling of impending doom over things and her feelings about Rochester becoming her idol and center of her life.

  2. Compare the Presentation of the Characters of Rochesterin "Jane Eyre" and Heathcliff in "WutheringHeights".

    Heathcliff is capable of extreme cruelty to innocent children and appears to have no conscience. He cannot be deterred from executing his revenge despite the fact that everyone who caused him pain is dead, "you shall pay for the plague of having you eternally in my sight".

  1. Both Wuthering Heights and Catcher in the Rye use very distinctive and individual characters ...

    Cathy has the same childish language as Heathcliff, as you can see from chapter nine, when she speaks to Nelly about Edgar. Cathy is more cheerful than Heathcliff nearer to the start of the book, until she marries Edgar. The daughter of Cathy; Catherine, has a strong and spiteful character

  2. Discuss Bronte's Presentation of Love in the Classic Novel Wuthering Heights

    However the fact that Mr and Mrs Earnshaw named him Heathcliff shows that they saw him as special from the very start as the name Heathcliff, 'was the name of a son who had died in childhood' Doing something like this is equivalent of being given a title like King

  1. Wuthering Heights Coursework. I will be exploring Emily Brontes presentation of the characters of ...

    Emily also uses a letter and diary entries in her novel so the reader can see from a different perspective and know how some of the other characters are feeling. Also it would give a different perspective on Wuthering Heights.

  2. Compare and Assess at least two of the following approaches in feminist theory, with ...

    This metrical indulgence, gives Goblin Market a sensual art for art's sake, which is usually reserved for male poets, making this offering to the public by a poetess incompatible with Victorian notions of female poetic beauty Laura performs a familiar role in literary history - that of the fallen Eve.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work