• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

It has been suggested by critics that Much Ado About Nothing shows that deceit is not inherently evil, but sometimes can be us

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

It has been suggested by critics that Much Ado About Nothing shows that deceit is not inherently evil, but sometimes can be used as a means to good or bad ends. What is your interpretation of the play? The word deceit means to give an appearance or an impression that is different from the true one. Deceit is a recurring theme in Much Ado About Nothing. Characters are constantly deceiving each other or being deceived, be it for good or bad means. Without this continual theme of deception the plot would not be able to unfold. The theme of deception is revealed early on in the play when Don Pedro, the prince, agrees to woo Hero in place of Claudio. 'I will assume thy part in some disguise And tell fair Hero I am Claudio,' Don Pedro also tells Claudio that 'we are the only love gods' meaning that nothing will happen between Claudio and Hero unless he intervenes. Here deception is used by Claudio and Don Pedro as a way to win Hero despite Claudio's seemingly shy and sensitive nature. Shakespeare could have constructed Claudio's character in this way as a way of illustrating the difference between the romantic, sensitive Claudio and the more outgoing and vibrant Don Pedro. Don Pedro successfully manages to woo Hero who happily agrees to marry Claudio, creating a happy resolution to Don Pedro's trickery; this then gives the audience an optimistic impression of Don Pedro. ...read more.

Middle

'Is it possible? Sits the wind around that corner?' Once that they are convinced that Benedick has taken the bait, his friends proceed by having fun at his expense, by describing his faults. This creates another similarity between this scene and between act three scene one, the scene in which Beatrice is deceived, Hero lists all Beatrice's faults. After describing all of Benedick's faults in his character, they then pretend to be concerned that he would mock Beatrice mercilessly if he found out her secret. Don Pedro is particularly enthusiastic in his abuse and every time the other characters, Lenoato and Claudio say something in Benedick's defence, the prince, Don Pedro then turns it in to an insult. Once they are convinced that their plan has worked the characters exit from the scene leaving Benedick alone on the stage to mull over what he has just heard. Benedick's soliloquy has a monosyllabic opening: 'This can be no trick' Benedick quickly desicides on whether to believe what he has heard, 'Beatrice's love must be requited' meaning that Beatrice's love needs to be repaid. Benedick decides to believe what he has heard. Although his decision is quick Benedick shows self critical awareness and maturity in his speech: 'I hear how I am censured, they say I will bear myself proudly, if I perceive the Love come of her: they say to that she will rather die than give any sign of affection' This scene is also very similar to the scene in which Beatrice is deceived. ...read more.

Conclusion

He will arrange for Hero to be absent so that the deceit can be successfully carried out. As the deception is occurring in Hero's bedchamber Claudio will assume that it is Hero in there. Also as it is hero's room most of the characters in the plot would be more likely to believe Claudio if hero does not have a solid alibi. This deception could be classed as 'bad' deception as it will destroy the good work that Don Pedro has done to get them together and it will 'poison' there marriage. It will also dishonour Claudio. Honour is a very important in the society that Shakespeare has created. The deception was created out of jealousy and hatred whereas the other deceits where created to get Beatrice and Benedick to realise there love for each other. In conclusion it could be said that the deceit in the plot of Much Ado About Nothing is not inherently evil as the main deceits, the tricking of Beatrice and Benedick to realise there true feelings for each other was necessary for the plot to develop but it was also done out of desperation of the other characters. The only deceit that could be portrayed as evil is Borachio's deception which was created due to the jealousy of Don John for Claudio; this was due to how Claudio was now favoured by his brother, the prince, Don Pedro. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Much Ado About Nothing section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Much Ado About Nothing essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    An Exploration of the Theme of Love inMuch Ado About Nothing ...

    4 star(s)

    fallen / Into a pit of ink, that the wide sea / Hath drops too few to wash her clean again'. He would rather that his daughter were dead than alive and bringing shame upon him (Act four, Scene one, line 152): 'Hence from her, let her die.'

  2. Discuss how Shakespeare creates the character of Benedick in Much Ado About Nothing

    the end, so the ending would not surprise them as much today's audience. But why does Benedick show so much detestation towards Beatrice? This scene only shows the audience Benedick's and Beatrice's present relationship but if the reader studies this scene carefully, they can gather enough information to explain why they are like this.

  1. Shakespeare's 'Much Ado About Nothing' Consider the various forms of deception, which an audience ...

    Leonato is outraged and says 'do not live Hero', meaning he would rather his daughter be dead than be dishonoured. Leonato also reacts by saying; 'she has fallen into a pit of ink, that the sea has too few drops to wash her clean again And salt too little which may season give her foul tainted flesh.

  2. How in "Much Ado About Nothing" does Shakespeare create dramatic tension?

    Postponement is again evident in the roundabout way in which Dogberry informs Leonato of their findings in the next scene. We are made to feel empathetically frustrated as Leonato states "I would fain know what you have to say...I am now in great haste, as it may appear unto you".

  1. The Importance of the Theme of Deception in "Much Ado About Nothing"

    This aspect would clearly resonate with a Shakespearean audience and reveals the social mores and ideology of the time. Women were defined in terms of a Madonna/Whore dichotomy and female worthiness was intrinsically linked to chastity. The plan not only exploits romantic- idealist Claudio's tendency to believe only what he

  2. Much Ado About Nothing Some Critics Have Seen Claudio as a 'problem'. How far ...

    However, social status and reputation is so important to all of the characters, including Claudio, that he sees what he wants to see, which is not necessarily always the truth. There is also a fear of dishonour, which in turn arises from the male fear of uncontrolled female sexuality.

  1. English A discussion of the way William Shakespeare presents the changing character of Benedick ...

    He hath every month a new sworn brother." Here she is again trying to find out information about Benedick, but also referring to his shallowness and fickleness, as every month he has a new best friend. She is insulting him again, but here she is also being slightly critical.

  2. "Much Ado About Nothing"

    "There is no measure in the occasion that breeds; therefore the sadness is without limit." Act 1 scene iii line 3. An angry aggressive element is revealed within Don John here and the true nature of his feelings towards Don Pedro and one of his closest companions Claudio is discovered;

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work