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"It is hard for the reader to feel any sympathy for Curley's Wife as she is responsible for her own death" - Of Mice and Men.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

"It is hard for the reader to feel any sympathy for Curley's Wife as she is responsible for her own death." > The language used to describe her; > Her relationship with her husband; > Her interaction with the other men on the ranch; > The events leading up to her death; > Anything else you may consider important. Through reading of the text of "Of Mice and Men", the reader finds it difficult to feel any sympathy for Curley's Wife, for she could be accused of being responsible for her own death. However, with close analysis of the language used to describe her, what the other characters say about her, her relationship with her husband, her interaction with the other men on the ranch, and the events leading up to her death, the reader may discover that other characters could be held partially accountable for her death. The reader can then form a balanced opinion of Curley's Wife's death and decide for him or herself just how much to blame she is for her death. ...read more.

Middle

This is an unlikely story that Curley's Wife clings "Maybe I will yet" to in an attempt to believe her live is worth something. It is also apparent that Curley's Wife perhaps married Curley simply out of spite for her mother, using her marriage, which was very soon after she met Curley, as an excuse for not pursuing her acting lifestyle. She tells Lennie, "My old Lady hid the letter". This is a very childish attitude and gives no reason to show sympathy for her loneliness as she chose it instead of admitting she was not going to act. She does now however, show her regret at marrying Curley as she is always trying to avoid him. This indicates that perhaps she has matured since marrying him and that some sympathy can be shown for her as she went to Lennie to talk with someone other than her husband whom she clearly does not like. Curley's Wife could have gone to Lennie in utmost desperation and so could be sympathized with, as she is lonely. ...read more.

Conclusion

Curley's Wife is a two-faced character. She fraternizes and flirts with the men on the ranch but only when it suits her. She comes into Crooks' stable, supposedly looking for Curley. To begin she stands seductively in the doorway "with her body thrust forward". The men in the stable are aware of her flirtatious behaviour and they demand that she leaves them alone as they think they will get into trouble. When Crooks makes a stand and asks her to leave his dwelling she scorns in a sharp tone- "Listen, Nigger, You know what I can do to you if you open your trap?" This suit-yourself and racist attitude illustrates how she uses the itinerant workers for friends when she feels like it and gives no reason to show her sympathy for her death. She also flirts with Lennie a lot. She realizes that Lennie crushed Curley's hand and does not accept the story that a machine crushed it. She then jokes about this and laughs at the thought of Curley being beaten by Lennie. As she is leaving the men in Crooks' stable she refers to Lennie as "Machine" and jokes how she "likes machines" in a flirtatious manner. ...read more.

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