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It might be said that by the end of book 6 Aeneas is fully ready to fulfill his destiny. To what extent have his experiences in books 4 and 6 worked against or contributed to this?

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Introduction

It might be said that by the end of book 6 Aeneas is fully ready to fulfill his destiny. To what extent have his experiences in books 4 and 6 worked against or contributed to this? The direction and destination of Aeneas' course are preordained, and his various encounters merely postpone his unchangeable destiny. His destiny is to actually reach Latium, and start Rome's origins. It is clearly evident that the issue as to whether he is able to do this is if he actually reaches Latium, many events over books IV and VI hamper or boost this. In book IV Aeneas I feel loses track of his destiny-his dalliance with Dido in Carthage is direct evidence for this. Events in book IV result in the two of them making love regularly and living together openly. Dido considers them to be marriage, even thought the union not officially consecrated in a ceremony. ...read more.

Middle

The message shocks Aeneas, but Virgil has made Aeneas a symbol of piety, he respects prophecy and attempts to incorporate them into his own actions. His ability to accept his destined path despite his unhappiness in doing so makes him a graceful hero, and also negates any ill effects of his time wasting with Dido has caused on his destiny. He finds it hard to tell Dido of his departure, and appear cold, and insensitive "I sail or Italy not of my own free will" (iv.499). I feel his glib tone is not him being cruel and insensitive as some people might irrationally say at first. On closer inspection it is evident that he is trying to act calm so that it has a calming effect on Dido also. Despite his efforts Dido writhes between fierce love and anger, and here we really see how much of a fatal thing love can be. ...read more.

Conclusion

Sibyl the warns him that no one enters Dis with any hope of returning. This obviously could turn into an event that could hinder his destiny. (Him being stuck in Dis) It is unusual for mortals to be allowed to be allowed to visit the realms of the dead, and then return to life. The golden bough is therefore a sigh of Aeneas' special privilege. The story proceeds, and in the field of Gladeness. Anchises describes what will become of the Trojan descendants: Romulus will found Rome, a Caesar from the lineage of Ascanius, and Rome will reach the Golden age and rule over the world. Finally, Aeneas grasps the profound significance of his long journey to Italy. Anchises accompanies Aeneas out of Dis with a new found sense of purpose. And so it is reasonable to conclude that on the whole even though his time in Carthage was a hindrance, the events caused by the Gods e.g. Juno, only delay the destiny, thanks to Aeneas' piety and wit, I would conclude the events in these books contribute to his destiny. ...read more.

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