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Jane Eyre

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Introduction

Kristin Kababik U6782074 19th Century Novel TM 01 Part 1 In Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre, the title character has to keep vigil over an apparently dying Mr Mason while Mr Rochester goes off for help. The overwhelming sentiment gained from reading these paragraphs is that this heroine is rather breathless and filled with anxiety. The short and incomplete sentences mimicking her eyes darting around the room and reflecting the short breaths she must be taking. There is also the sense of her mind running away with fright the longer she sits there nursing Mr Mason, worrying if Grace Poole, whom she believed to be the cause of this trauma, was capable of getting out and attacking her in the same way. The longer she sits in this darkening room the more questions pop into her head and without answers to them, they only get worse and more frequent. Jane Eyre's description of the patient's eyes actually quite reflects what her own would be doing if she didn't have him to look after so closely. The eyes darting around, opening and closing, the horrified look in his eyes mirroring her own emotions. ...read more.

Middle

These few pages convey intense emotion through sentence structure and language. The short sentences broken by other thoughts reflects the way the brain works in these situations, we were no longer the confidant of Jane Eyre but we could almost slip into her place, as if all this was happening to the reader. The short breaths, the fear, listening for signs of things getting worse or about to get better, the unanswered questions which wouldn't get answered, not at least when they were weighing so heavily on our heroine. The language was simple and informal as the situation required. While it was probably more than the sheltered and unworldly governess could ever have expected to experience, Jane Eyre did as ordered, as seen through the 'I must' sentences. However, it would have been unreasonable to expect our heroine not to have questioned these strange events, especially as they concerned the safety of Mr Rochester. Kristin Kababik U6782074 19th Century Novel TM 01 Part 2 There are a few aspects that this passage relates to the rest of the novel. In one aspect there is the second confidence that Mr Rochester puts in Jane Eyre by calling her to help him a second time, and trusting her to keep the scene a secret from the rest of the residents in the house that night. ...read more.

Conclusion

Later in the novel, when Jane Eyre was wandering through the fields cold and hungry she swore that the light she saw off in the distance was that of the final light, she thought her eyes were deceiving her, but as she neared the source, she realized they weren't, it was indeed the light from a house. Jane's time at Lowood House could go some way to describe her reactions at points in her life when she is most stressed. As Jane Eyre is a story about a heroine coming into her own, self revelation is an integral part of this. She finds things out about herself that she either doesn't think she is capable of or, through modesty, won't admit to being capable of. This scene proves to her and the reader that she is capable of handling even the most trying events when required to by Mr Rochester. The questions here remain unanswered for a great deal of the novel, however, until she learns of the nature of the relationship between Mason and Rochester and what the 'Fury' in that hidden cupboard was, at which time she feels as though she has been deceived even though she was given no answers previously. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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