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Jane Eyre

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Introduction

Jane Eyre Before writing this assignment I am going to write about the novelist who possibly has written one of the best novels I have ever read. The novelist who wrote Jane Eyre is called Charlotte Bronte, Charlotte was born In Thornton, Yorkshire in 1816. She was the third child to have been born by her parents Maria and Patrick Bronte. Mrs.Bronte died in the year of 1821 so Charlotte and her fours sisters and her Brother Branwell were left in the loving care of their aunt Elizabeth Branwell- Charlotte and her sisters were sent to a school of Daughters Of The Clergy. Between 1831 to 1832 Charlotte was at Miss.Woolers school at Roehead where she did later return as a teacher in 1835. In 1847 she published Jane Eyre. This became a success so she later published three over novels "Shirley", "Villette" and "Professor". The Bronte sisters Charlotte, Emily and Anne all created brave and indomitable heroines: Charlotte's Jane Eyre, Emily's fiery Catherine Earnshaw of the famous book Withering heights and Anne's Helen Graham who was in the Tenant of Wildfell Hall left her drunken and brutal husband- perhaps partly based on their brother Branwell taking her son with her and earning a living as an artist, and audacious action in the masculine dominated world of Victorian Society. To have their books published they had to adopt male pseudonyms. By the names of Currer, Ellis and Acton Bell. ...read more.

Middle

Jane is not clearly swung by St.John's proposal of marriage as she sees what he wishes her hand in marriage for. Jane made a sensible position to stay but what could be the reason for it? Rochester or the love of her position in life. When she declines St.John with good reason she lets him down by stating "Nonsense, again! Marry! I don't want to marry and never shall marry". She stated this because she was let down by the first marriage as it was a hoax because Rochester was married already, this Jane knew nothing of the matter but still she dealt with the problem by running away from it not dealing with the issue before it became un dealable. The issues in Bronte's novel reflect the roles women had to play in the strong male dominant Victorian Society. (Of which Jane refuses to confirm too entirely). This was the time when women were treated as men's possessions, women were legally, spiritually and morally and they had no rights in property, belongings or children. Men and women who lived together about being married were ostracised. Consequently Mr.Rochester cannot divorce his wife and therefore does not reveal her existence to new lover Jane. Similarly Jane will not agree to go abroad with St.John as his accomplice and wife or with Mr.Rochester as his wife in name only. Rochester points out that she has no relations to scandalise but she feels she has to abide by the principles of society: "Laws and principles ...read more.

Conclusion

Lowood gave Jane the opportunity to gain an education also the independence to leave for a new servitude (see page 87). Jane became independent and reliable. But Jane also had to get used to the male dominant pig Mr.Brockelhurst who uses religion as a big matter in the institution to scare people. Jane grew up quickly and became used to this she then retaliated and refused anyone to get the better of her. Whereas Thornfield Hall reveals the shallowness of vanity and fashion in the form of dowager Lady Ingram and her daughters, although Rochester rejects this society in favour of Jane's she never feels his social equal and is uncomfortable with the opportunity to embellish herself. Throughout Jane's period at Thornfield, Jane consistently refers to Rochester as 'master' and 'sir'. Even in their utmost intimate movements and discussions after the failed marriage, Jane still refers to him as 'Mr.Rochester'. The nature of the relationship is clearly unbalanced; neither character has yet achieved a state of self- knowledge within which marriage could succeed. Jane knows that she cannot remain. The arrival of Blanche Ingram brings Jane down to earth. Blanche despises governesses, she tried to court Rochester but shows no real love him. The theme of impedance appears in Jane's relationship with men. Although having money is also part of the theme independence it is not as important as Jane's need to rebel. This is highlighted by the contrasts; Mr.Brockelhurst is an example of religious hypocrisy and Miss. Ingram's of social hypocrisy. Jane Eyre is a really good read and I really thoroughly enjoyed studying it. ...read more.

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