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Jane Eyre Essay

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Introduction

Jane Eyre Essay In this essay I will be exploring how Charlotte Bronte conveys hardships in her portrayal of life. Furthermore the issue of life in Victorian England and what Victorian readers may think of the treatment of children will also be looked upon. Many of the hardships that children face are shown through the several descriptions and the actions of characters that are close to Jane. Throughout the text we learn that the novel explores the lack of rights and mistreatment of an orphan by her rich relatives. The issues of child abuse are often considered between the Reed family. In the novel the portrayal of the reed children seems to interfere with Jane's life. The author emphasises them to be unfriendly and unkind to Jane as she is an adopted sister. They are shown as being immoral and haughty. They like to abuse Jane because they feel she is inferior. Their feelings of superiority towards Jane are what cause them to intimidate and torment Jane. The depiction of John Reed shows him to be a bully and unaffectionate: "John had not much affection for his mother or sisters" which indicates ungratefulness from John towards the rest of his family. ...read more.

Middle

Reed." this indicates that Jane is elated as in the presence of a stranger as she will not be physically abused. This in effect proclaims that Jane has a predominant fear of the Reed's especially Mrs Reed and John Reed. Bessie is manifested as someone who has a love for Jane to some extent as her opinion on Jane changes after the occurrence in the Red Room. However, when Jane misbehaves she handles her appropriately. Her treatment towards Jane is proclaimed through the text "Missis was rather too hard" which denotes that even Bessie finds Mrs Reed's treatment towards Jane extremely inconsiderate and inappropriate. On the other hand she treats Jane appropriately when Jane misbehaves or is blamed such as the incident after the fight; "If you don't sit still, you must be tied down," which corroborates that Bessie is a fair person and is un-opinionated person towards Jane. Bronte also creates various moods to help the spectators appreciate Jane's situation. The weather is related to the mood that Jane will elaborate on in the following and upcoming paragraphs. We can notify this from the quote "the cold winter had brought with it clouds so sombre, and a rain so penetrating, that further outdoor exercise was now out of the question." ...read more.

Conclusion

The poor had to work to earn a living, however, for the rich it was a walk in the park. Regardless of the fact that people had not to accept someone, they did although only for the sake of their reputation. This is what the Reed family did and accommodated Jane. However by doing so they may not comprehend the anguish they are presenting the adopted child. We also learn that school life for children in Victorian England was a disregard towards them as they were disrespected and ignored. The living conditions for children in the schools were abysmal as there were a number of students in one class and they were all emaciated. This may make Victorian readers think that the treatment of children was, to an intensity, immensely astringent, horrendous and unreasonable. It may also make them think about how they treated their children and whether they had mentally and physically destroyed their child's emotions by means of neglection. Bronte may have done this so that she could express her life to the public. She used her experiences in the Evangelical school and as governess to publish "Jane Eyre". Also her experience at the Clergy Daughter's School, which she left due to harsh conditions, could be another reason. Overall her lifetime experiences are the reasons for her to publish this novel. ...read more.

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