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John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men

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Introduction

Of Mice and Men Throughout John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men it becomes apparent that Lennie Small is like a big child through his lack of judgement of his strength, his bad memory, and his dependancy on George. First, he is unaware of his own strength. He likes petting mice, but kills them by petting them too hard. When he is touching the hair of Curley's wife, he breaks her neck accidentally. Secondly, his memory is very poor. He can't remember many things, and when he does remember things, he remembers inaccurately or differently. When George tells him to hide in the place where they slept before they went to the ranch, Lennie remembers what George says, but can't remember the place. ...read more.

Middle

When George tells him to hide in the place where they slept before they went to the ranch, Lennie remembers what George says, but can't remember the place. Last, Lennie is entirely dependant on George. When Lennie is getting punched he doesn't think to fight back unti George tells him to. Without George Lennie wouldn't be able to survive. In conclusion, Lennie is like a big child through his actions, dependancies, and judgement. Throughout John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men it becomes apparent that Lennie Small is like a big child through his lack of judgement of his strength, his bad memory, and his dependancy on George. First, he is unaware of his own strength. ...read more.

Conclusion

First, he is unaware of his own strength. He likes petting mice, but kills them by petting them too hard. When he is touching the hair of Curley's wife, he breaks her neck accidentally. Secondly, his memory is very poor. He can't remember many things, and when he does remember things, he remembers inaccurately or differently. When George tells him to hide in the place where they slept before they went to the ranch, Lennie remembers what George says, but can't remember the place. Last, Lennie is entirely dependant on George. When Lennie is getting punched he doesn't think to fight back unti George tells him to. Without George Lennie wouldn't be able to survive. In conclusion, Lennie is like a big child through his actions, dependancies, and judgement. Wang Chung ...read more.

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