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Julius Caesar

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Introduction

JULIUS CAESAR The play Julius Caesar is about dirty politics and power in Rome, how some would do anything for leadership and anything for their city. The play opened in a lively theatrical manner, noisy citizens soon grabbed the attention of Flavius and Marullus, the importance of the crowd was immediately established. The crowd were in holiday mood ready to cheer Caesar. We saw they were easily manipulated, Flavius & Marullus interrogated some of them with questions. They speak to a carpenter and a cobbler, the cobbler is in a jolly mood and answered Marullus in an impolite manner, Marullus soon demanded them to leave, ''Tongue - tired in there guiltiness,'' is what he says. This is where we see excessive desire for power and freedom by Flavius and Marullus, in other words we see greediness and disliking of Caesar from Flavius and Marullus. Caesars wife Calphurnia, had failed to have any children, so Caesar decides that if Calphuria stands in Antony's way during the Lupercal ceremonies, then she would be able to conceive. Whilst Caesar was at the Festival of Lupercal, he was approached by a soothsayer, the soothsayer warns Caesar to ''Beware the ides of march.'' Caesar dismissed him as a dreamer and moved on, Caesar said 'He is a dreamer let us leave him: pass''. ...read more.

Middle

Cicero left Casca, and Cassius arrived. Casca and Cassius talked about the storm, Cassius sensed that Casca is disturbed in the head, and can easily be drawn into the conspiracy against Caesar. He explained to Casca that the storms are a warning from the heavens " Instrument of fear and warning" Casca picked the hint up immediately, Casca revealed the senators intent, on the following day to make Caesar king, of not only Rome but also the provinces of the Roman empire outside Italy. Dramatically Cassius revealed he rather kill himself than live under the rule of Caesar. Casca agreed to be in the conspiracy. Soon after Cinna arrived looking for Cassius, Cassius told him they need to win support of Brutus, Cassius handed over forged letters to Cinna, seeming to come from angry citizens calling on Brutus to protect the freedom of Rome against Caesar. Caesars wife Calphurnia, had been disturbed and believed her husband was in terrible danger, she did not want Caesar to go to the Capitol. Caesar did not believe all this and thinks no one is against him. Calphurnia begged him not to go, but Caesar decided not to go. Later that day, Antony arrived for Caesar and persuaded him to go to the capitol. ...read more.

Conclusion

Whereas now we live in a democracy, where everyone has an opinion, no single ruler, now The Prime minister Tony Blair has opposition 'The Conservative party'(the main opposition party) and 'The Liberal Democrats' who debate nearly all the agendas set by the prime minister and the Labour government. Secondly the Royal family, who back in the Shakespeare era were the ruler such as Henry viii. They would have immense power and respect and hardly any critics, again anyone who was critical of there rule would have been killed. while now nearly the whole nation dislikes our Royal family, especially Charles and his love life (except the pensioners!), this is mainly due to the media, especially the tabloid papers who expose nearly every move the Royal family makes in their private life, for example Prince Charles and his girlfriend Camilla, when in a conversation on the telephone he said I'd wish I was a tampon, then I could spend the whole day with you". I personally do not really think that is fair on anyone. A few weeks ago on a television interview Claire Short formally of the Labour government, started insulting Blair and his stance on the war on Iraq she said "Blair made a colossal error of misjudgement on the war on Iraq." She also said how cowardly he is, This was very similar to what Cassius said about Caesar to Brutus to persuade him in the conspiracy against Caesar. ...read more.

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