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Keats, John. "To Autumn."

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Introduction

Bryan Vaz Commentary on "To Autumn" 25/09/04 IB English HL2 An End to Ends "To Autumn" is one of the most famous, and perfect odes written by John Keats, and any modern writer. It is quite fitting that his greatest piece was the last one that he ever wrote before he met with his unfortunate end. However, this ode has some significant differences to the other odes that he has written. Firstly, there is no flight from reality, or deviation into imagination or dream, in fact there is no narrative voice at all. Secondly, it has an unprecedented emphasis and commemoration of change and progress, not only through autumn, but through all mortal events. ...read more.

Middle

The "budding" implies an ongoing activity along with "flowers of bees" that is potentially eternal and immortal. It reaches a point of abundance that the bees "think warm days will never cease." Finally Keats cites "Summer" responsible, not only for the bees over filled cells, but for everything else that is happening. In the second stanza, the intense ripening mentioned before has reached its zenith and is ready to be harvested. Autumn is personified as a reaper or a harvester in this stanza that crosses a brook or is "by a cider-press, with a patient look." However, for the rest of the time it is lethargic and even sleeping. ...read more.

Conclusion

However in this case, it is not something that has passed but of what is to come. The day is ending, just like the season, and the yet, with a dying sun, beauty is created. The "clouds bloom," and the "soft-dying day" covers "the stubble planes with rosy hue." Finally, all the creatures even though they are dying, accepts their fate and tries to make an impression on the world that will be remembered. The lambs "bleat" in attempt to let the entire land know of their fate, gnats "morn" in a "wailful choir" and the robin "whistles" filling the air with music. Finding this in Keats' final and most triumphant poem informs the reader that Keats is trying to leave the world in the same manner, hoping his memory will live on in his poetry. ...read more.

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