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Keats once said about Byron, "He describes what he sees- I describe what I imagine, mine is the hardest task". To Autumn is evidence of his way of thinking, as the poem is a vivid, lyrical portrayal of the English Autumn as he imagined it.

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Introduction

Keats once said about Byron, "He describes what he sees- I describe what I imagine, mine is the hardest task". To Autumn is evidence of his way of thinking, as the poem is a vivid, lyrical portrayal of the English Autumn as he imagined it. The poem follows the traditional framework of an ode. It is overly lyrical and has a rhyme scheme, generally common to all three stanzas, with the exception of the third stanza. The poem also employs iambic pentameter and throughout the poem uses powerful language to achieve effect. It constantly makes use of imagery, exaggerated language and onomatopoeia. To Autumn celebrates autumn as a season of abundance, reflection, and a season of preparation for Winter. Keats' also sees autumn as a season worthy of admiration, comparing it to what romantic poetry usually focuses on- Spring. ...read more.

Middle

the next swath and all its twined flowers: The second half of this stanza consists of the realization of Autumn in a physical action, representing a girl as Autumn, describing hoe Autumn helps the fruits and crops grow and how it watches as they are harvested. The third stanza compares autumn to spring and this is where the true meaning of the poem is conveyed: Where are the songs of spring? Ay, where are they? Think not of them, thou hast thy music too,- Keats has recognized the almost clich� use of Spring, as new life in Romantic poetry, and even before. He takes the positives out of autumn- the lambs are strong enough to look after themselves, "Full grown lamb's loud bleat from hilly bourn" To Autumn sees the conclusions of many of the themes which have been brought up in "Ode on Indolence" and the other odes. ...read more.

Conclusion

He seems to conclude that the knowledge that good things will come to an end makes you enjoy and appreciate them more. Finally, in To Autumn Keats seems to be able to take a more balanced view of life; he is able to experience beauty and appreciate this and concentrates on the positives, forgetting about the forthcoming the chill of winter. In conclusion, I believe that Keats motivation to write To Autumn was to use an understanding of autumn, representing the end of life, is just as important as the spring, which represents new life. The personification may not just be to give the reader an alternative view of the seasons; it could be to give the reader an alternative view of life. I believe that what Keats is telling us is that to appreciate the simple things in life, such as the warmth of summer or the new life of Spring- the decay of life, and the monotony of autumn, is essential to existence. Ode to Autumn By Chris Busby 13WL ...read more.

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