• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Keats once said about Byron, "He describes what he sees- I describe what I imagine, mine is the hardest task". To Autumn is evidence of his way of thinking, as the poem is a vivid, lyrical portrayal of the English Autumn as he imagined it.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Keats once said about Byron, "He describes what he sees- I describe what I imagine, mine is the hardest task". To Autumn is evidence of his way of thinking, as the poem is a vivid, lyrical portrayal of the English Autumn as he imagined it. The poem follows the traditional framework of an ode. It is overly lyrical and has a rhyme scheme, generally common to all three stanzas, with the exception of the third stanza. The poem also employs iambic pentameter and throughout the poem uses powerful language to achieve effect. It constantly makes use of imagery, exaggerated language and onomatopoeia. To Autumn celebrates autumn as a season of abundance, reflection, and a season of preparation for Winter. Keats' also sees autumn as a season worthy of admiration, comparing it to what romantic poetry usually focuses on- Spring. ...read more.

Middle

the next swath and all its twined flowers: The second half of this stanza consists of the realization of Autumn in a physical action, representing a girl as Autumn, describing hoe Autumn helps the fruits and crops grow and how it watches as they are harvested. The third stanza compares autumn to spring and this is where the true meaning of the poem is conveyed: Where are the songs of spring? Ay, where are they? Think not of them, thou hast thy music too,- Keats has recognized the almost clich� use of Spring, as new life in Romantic poetry, and even before. He takes the positives out of autumn- the lambs are strong enough to look after themselves, "Full grown lamb's loud bleat from hilly bourn" To Autumn sees the conclusions of many of the themes which have been brought up in "Ode on Indolence" and the other odes. ...read more.

Conclusion

He seems to conclude that the knowledge that good things will come to an end makes you enjoy and appreciate them more. Finally, in To Autumn Keats seems to be able to take a more balanced view of life; he is able to experience beauty and appreciate this and concentrates on the positives, forgetting about the forthcoming the chill of winter. In conclusion, I believe that Keats motivation to write To Autumn was to use an understanding of autumn, representing the end of life, is just as important as the spring, which represents new life. The personification may not just be to give the reader an alternative view of the seasons; it could be to give the reader an alternative view of life. I believe that what Keats is telling us is that to appreciate the simple things in life, such as the warmth of summer or the new life of Spring- the decay of life, and the monotony of autumn, is essential to existence. Ode to Autumn By Chris Busby 13WL ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE John Keats section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE John Keats essays

  1. Compare and contrast Keats 'Ode of Autumn' with Heaney's 'Death of a Naturalist' bringing ...

    While Keats and his siblings moved in with their grandmother his mother disappeared, and then reappeared a few years later, ill with tuberculosis. Keats nursed her until she died and after that his attitude to the world changed. He then trained to be an apothecary and passed the exam in

  2. To Autumn

    Autumn will 'fill all fruit with ripeness to the core' and will 'swell the gourd, and plump the hazel shells.' These two phrases are both examples where the effective use of the text creates the generous, kind tranquil atmosphere. For example, there will be no half measures as 'all' the fruit will be 'filled' with ripeness.

  1. Analyse the different attitudes the poets John Keats and P.B. Shelley have towards nature ...

    This can clearly be seen in the poem 'Ode To A Nightingale' where he is almost envious of the nightingale's position and wants to "fly" into its world. The poets also touch upon various sense impressions. The west wind in Shelley's poem is "wild" and harsh, appealing to the sense of touch.

  2. Compare the ways in which Keats addresses personal concerns in "Ode to a Nightingale ...

    reflects Keats own change in thought - as he's crossing the 'shore' from one state to another. The previous rhyming words at the end of each line have been long and soft ending in vowels such as 'more' or 'grain'.

  1. Compare and contrast the views of Autumn inTed Hughes's 'There Came A Day' and ...

    John Keats uses "whistle" and "twitter" in the last stanza of his poem to describe the songs of birds. Keats also uses the effect of alliteration in the second stanza, when he talks about the "winnowing wind'' this is describing the character of the autumn wind.

  2. Commentary: Ode to a nightingale by john keats

    This highlights how he is not sure which is real the world of his imagination that he was in or the world he is in now. " Was it a vision, or a waking dream?... do I wake or sleep".

  1. The Ode is used as a poetic form for philosophical contemplation. Compare two ...

    During the fifth stanza Keats cannot see any flowers but guesses that they are 'in embalmed darkness'. Straight into the sixth stanza, Keats feels that he has been 'half in love' with the concept of death and he has called Death soft names in many rhymes.

  2. Compare and contrast Keats' presentation of time, transience and mortality in "Ode to Autumn" ...

    (line 31). Keats is desperate to follow the nightingale, he even considers following it and flying away with it. Keats thought that originally he would be left with a feeling of ecstasy whereas he was left with feelings of emptiness.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work