• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

law and order lord of the flies

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Law and Order One of the first characters to emerge as a distinct personality is Piggy, who represents law and order. One of Piggy's first inspirations is brought about by the sight of a conch in a pool. When Ralph retrieves the conch, Piggy realizes that: "We can use this to call the others. Have a meeting". Piggy's first instinct is for organization, and the conch which he spots becomes a symbol of the fragile system of order that the boys create. Piggy is critical of the kind of freedom that leads to disorder and chaos. When the boys agree to build a fire on the mountain to send a smoke signal, the first meeting breaks up as everyone rushes towards the mountain. Like the crowd of boys, the fire quickly gets out of control, and one of the younger boys appears to be missing -probably trapped in the burning jungle. Piggy tells the others that they have acted "like a pack of kids!" and asks, "How can you expect to be rescued if you don't put first things first and act proper?" ...read more.

Middle

Consequently, the fire goes out and a chance for rescue is missed. When Ralph and Piggy point out Jack's fault, Jack refuses to accept responsibility and instead turns to violence, striking Piggy and causing his glasses to break. The more freedom Jack has, the less responsible he becomes. Ultimately he rejects the small semblance of order that has been created, refusing to listen to the chosen leader or follow the agreed-upon rules. "Bollocks to the rules!". A few days later, he leaves the society and is soon joined by other boys who wish to hunt rather than build shelters and gather food. In this new society, Jack leaves behind any sense of social agreement or moral order. He is a brutal dictator who does not need to appeal to logic or reason to gain societal support. As two of his tribe's members discuss the planned beating of Wilfred, a third tribal member, one boy asks the other why Wilfred is to be beaten. The other responds, "I don't know. He didn't say". Jack appeals to the boys' fear of the unknown and desire for violent conquest with a regime in which he is free to behave as he pleases, with no limits and no set order. ...read more.

Conclusion

What are you going to do about that?". In the end, his society is reduced to one -himself. Piggy and the conch die together in a confrontation with Jack's group, the remaining members of Ralph's society are kidnapped by Jack's tribe, and Ralph is hunted through the forest as Jack attempts to destroy any challenge to his brutal authority. Ralph is saved by the arrival of a navy ship, but Golding leaves open the question of whether or not human society as a whole can be rescued. Golding points out that "the officer, having interrupted a man-hunt, prepares to take the children off the island in a cruiser which will presently be hunting its enemy in the same implacable way. And who will rescue the adult and his cruiser?" In Lord of the Flies, Golding has shown that humans are naturally attracted, not to law and order, or even a balance of order and freedom through social agreement, but to unlimited freedom without responsibility. This irresponsible freedom leads not to anarchy, but to a totalitarian regime in which those who are strongest exercise their freedom with impunity. Those who, like Piggy and Ralph, attempt to place limit on the freedom of some for the benefit of all, end up sacrificing not only their freedom, but even their lives in the struggle. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE William Golding section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Here's what a star student thought of this essay

5 star(s)

Response to the question

This answer focuses on the establishment of law and order in William Golding's novel 'Lord of the Flies' well and upholds a consistent focus on the question steer proposed. A number of sources of law and order have been addressed, ...

Read full review

Response to the question

This answer focuses on the establishment of law and order in William Golding's novel 'Lord of the Flies' well and upholds a consistent focus on the question steer proposed. A number of sources of law and order have been addressed, with the candidate selecting appropriate moments within the novel that show the growth of civilisation and the social morals required to run a civilisation, but also the degradation and deterioration of humanity within the boys as they spend more and more time away from the rules and responsibilities of life back in England. It is very good to see such a well-informed approach to Golding's own incentives and writing purposes in this answer - the candidate discusses what Golding's attitudes and values to humanity were and this develops their contextual appreciation of the novel, winning marks exponentially by showing the examiner and excellent knowledge of not just what happens in the novel, but what the plots/motifs/themes/characters symbolise, and also what Golding meant by these allegories.

Level of analysis

The Level of Analysis shown by this candidate is deeply profound where it has been exercised. There is a good understanding of the entire novel evident, and also an understanding of the thematic elements of the novel - "In Lord of the Flies, Golding has shown that humans are naturally attracted, not to law and order, or even a balance of order and freedom through social agreement, but to unlimited freedom without responsibility" - this level of analysis is so richly described and so inextricably accurate it's difficult to pick fault with such a sensitive awareness. Even the moment where "the officer" arrives on the island to rescue the boys, the candidate makes hugely valid criticisms of the presentation of law and order, and how the theme resonates even beyond the novel. This is a success in all manners of the word because the candidate has lifted the themes explored off of the page and expanded what Golding wanted to achieve into a generalised setting, meaning that the candidate is not bound by the novel itself, but more obviously they embrace what the novel gives them and, addressing the question at all time, writes a thoroughly insightful and with unbroken focus.
The use of quoting is also exceptional, drawing on appropriate sources from the text which shows a clever and thorough knowledge of the play, and that the candidate has the ability to carefully structure an answer so that it is consistently coherent and cohesive. This is by far and away a model answer.

Quality of writing

The Quality of Written Communication is excellent. Though not perfect, in that the candidate doesn't challenge themselves with the most elusively complex brand of punctuation on frequent occasions, this answer adheres very nicely to the expected standards of written English for GCSE level. A wider range of punctuation would possibly show more confidence in a lesser well-written answer, but for the level of analysis displayed here, the candidate could not hope to improve on something as relatively insignificant to the brilliant analysis.


Did you find this review helpful? Join our team of reviewers and help other students learn

Reviewed by sydneyhopcroft 14/03/2012

Read less
Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE William Golding essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Fear of the Unknown- Lord of the Flies

    5 star(s)

    On the contrary, the fear has also some indirect good effect on the society. The fear in the island made the group come together as a community. The whole idea of this fear was communicated through assemblies. This was because Ralph, resembles a typical democrat leader, always thought calling an

  2. Marked by a teacher

    Violent Society in Lord of the Flies

    4 star(s)

    The conditioning is what keeps them from become savages as it suppresses the darkness within human nature. But the conditioning can never fully rid the boys of this dark temperament, and so as the conditioning ceases to play a part in the development of their behaviour, the wicked disposition grows

  1. TITANIC – Critical Essay

    The mood is unhappy and upsetting and tears are flowing from the eyes of Rose. The music is relatively non-existent although there is a low note that is held and the footsteps and crying of Rose add to the tension.

  2. To what extent is Lord of the flies a pessimistic book?

    His cheek is 'silvered' and his shoulder becomes 'sculptured marble'. Using these expensive materials Golding makes Simon seem special or holy. The creatures are kind to him, they 'busied themselves around his head...lifted the body a fraction..from the sand.' They lift up Simon to help him into the water.

  1. What Does It Mean to be Civilized

    The group is roughly divided into boys of around the age of six who are called littluns, and biguns who are between ten and twelve. Ralph's aim is to form a society similar to the one they have left behind and at an early date he establishes rules regarding the conduct of meetings, shelters, fresh water and latrines.

  2. Themes, Motifs, and Symbols - Themes are the fundamental concepts addressed and explored in ...

    Furious, Ralph accosts Jack, but the hunter has just returned with his first kill, and all the boys seem gripped with a strange frenzy, re-enacting the chase in a kind of wild dance. When Piggy criticizes him, Jack hits him across the face.

  1. Compare how the authors present and use the concept of the island setting in ...

    You behave in a way true to only yourself, as the boys did. The intensity of the situation proved that innocence doesn't last forever. The island and the characters provide the balance between good and evil. In 'Lord of the Flies' the island provokes the evil in the boys; whereas in 'Robinson Crusoe' the island provokes the good.

  2. To what extent do you consider the Lord of the Flies to be a ...

    had the chance; consequently he made sure that at the next opportunity, he did what he thought was necessary. He killed the pig not only out of the urge to hunt, but out of the risk of being humiliated; he didn't want to seem soft like Piggy.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work