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Look again at "Mirror" in which Plath explores ways in which we see ourselves and others. Compare this poem with one other poem which also deals in some way with social interactions.

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Introduction

Look again at "Mirror" in which Plath explores ways in which we see ourselves and others. Compare this poem with one other poem which also deals in some way with social interactions. "Mirror" is a reflection of Plath's most inner feelings and her rather passive view on both her life and that of around her. The two stanzas in the poem reveal her need to find her real self and a compelling fear if being alone. She describes the mirror as an unambiguous, single dimension that absorbs everything around it and doesn't judge anything. She talks about it "meditating on the opposite wall", implying that it receives emotions and peacefully thinks and observes the world. She then uses another metaphor when she describes herself as a lake. The lake is a reflection of herself, but at a deeper level than perhaps the mirror was. She has distinct fears of aging and being alone. ...read more.

Middle

Her Grandmother had died, the speaker feels deep guilt and sadness, and starts to reflect on all of her regrets. She even starts questioning if there really is true love. "And when she died I felt no grief at all", questions whether she is feeling real loss over her grandmothers death, or if she just feels like there's a gap in her guardianship. Real loss is loosing someone you love rather than their position in your life, and this poem reveals that. Like in the "Mirror", the writer uses metaphors to describe other people's views on her, and her views on herself. She compares her Grandmother to antique objects and how she is afraid of being treated like an object - not a person. The antiques show that she used to lead a passive life but now lives passively. ...read more.

Conclusion

It deals more with the world around us, rather than in front of us like the Mirror describes. The speaker in "My Grandmother" talks of regret from not loving enough whilst she had the chance, whereas the speaker in the "Mirror" talks about regret from loving itself. She's alone in the world, and feels let down by the people in her life. The speaker in "My Grandmother" feels as though she had done the letting down. She feels an element of guilt from regret, the speaker in the "Mirror" feels regret from not having the closeness in a relationship she probably craves. Both poems are talking about a sense of loss, but there is a more physical aspect of the emotion in "My Grandmother". She has really suffered a loss from a real life relationship, and is beginning to understand it, whereas the speaker in the "mirror" hasn't developed a relationship with anyone other than objects, and feels a deep loss because of it. ...read more.

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