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Look at a particular episode/incident in the novel and focus on what that episode shows us about women. (Pride And Prejudice)

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Introduction

Look at a particular episode/incident in the novel and focus on what that episode shows us about women. Jane Austen, the author of Pride And Prejudice was born in 1775 and was the youngest of seven children. She was tall, slender, with brown hair and everyone liked her. Although several men proposed to her, she always refused them. Jane Austen is similar to Elizabeth in the story; Elizabeth also has 2 marriage proposals and turns them down. Both women have more modern views on life. I think that this is important in many ways, as through her writing, Jane Austen can get her views across. I think that Elizabeth was created in the story to symbolize Jane Austen and her views. Within this story, I have noticed that Jane Austen has included no physical description of any of the characters; I think this is because she wishes to create stereotypes. Also, there is no mention of the outside world e.g. at the time of the story, there was a war going on, but she creates her own little world in the story free of any political events or wars etc. ...read more.

Middle

She is therefore, dismayed at the fact that Elizabeth has refused to marry and tries to persuade her to reconsider her choice e.g. 'you must come and make Lizzy marry Mr. Collins'. However, she still has her daughter's best interests at heart and wants all her daughters to marry well to have a financially stable future. This incident between Elizabeth, Charlotte and Mr Collins, shows us that at the time, women were only expected to marry someone rich and become accomplished at things like needlework and singing. This is portrayed earlier in the novel. As Elizabeth is a more modern character, she is very shocked when almost straight after her rejection her friend, Charlotte Lucas marries him. We too, share her shock, but even Jane approves of the marriage. It is because of the way society worked at that time, that the marriage doesn't come as a shock to most and even Charlotte Lucas says 'I am not a romantic, nor have I ever been'. The reason for Charlotte marrying Mr Collins isn't love because that isn't what was expected at that time. ...read more.

Conclusion

Women couldn't get a job and they had no money of their own, so this meant that they had to rely on their father for money or some other male relative. When the male relatives in the household had passed away, the women had to be married to a good, fairly wealthy husband. When Elizabeth didn't marry, it was a shock to all because women were meant to accept the first offer of marriage they had in order to secure their future and remain financially stable. Men in those days were considered far more respectable than women and were also considered to play a larger role in society. They were the only ones who went out to work, unless they were very wealthy, such as aristocrats. In the novel, Elizabeth doesn't seem to like the role of women and opposes it, whereas others seemed to accept it. She is independent and more sure of herself - very clever and witty too. Her independence is the key feature that separates her out from others and is also what makes her a very different (and shocking) character for her time. Amandeep Jheeta 11JD Pride And Prejudice GCSE English Prose Coursework Mrs Sanders ...read more.

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