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Look at the significance of chapter five of Frankenstein to the novel as a whole. Focus on the relevance and effect of writer's use of language to describe setting and character and what it shows about social and historical influences.

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Introduction

Look at the significance of chapter five to the novel as a whole. Focus on the relevance and effect of writer's use of language to describe setting and character and what it shows about social and historical influences. 'Frankenstein' by Mary Shelley is a complex horror novel that was written during the age of Romanticism. It contains many themes common to a Romantic novel such as death, tragedy, and loneliness. These themes have all arrived through Mary Shelley's background as the events in this novel have been influenced greatly by her life. We can see that this novel has been written as a warning to tell the reader what the consequences are of playing with nature. This is highly relevant to today as even now scientists feel they can experiment with nature, for example, cloning. A highly crucial part of this novel is Chapter five. It is where the story really begins as now Frankenstein has reached his goal and realizes the horror of what he has done. ...read more.

Middle

In Chapter five, however, Victor wakes up and "the beauty of the dream vanished and breathless horror and disgust filled (his) heart." Now his character has completely changed as when his creation comes to life he flees the monstrosity, "I rushed out of the room, and continued a long time traversing my bedchamber." This is ironic as he is being terrified by something of his own creation. It is this part in the novel where the reader may start to dislike Frankenstein as it is not the act of creation we condemn but rather his lack of willingness to accept the responsibility for his deeds. The way Victor treats his creation in chapter five is cruel and hard-hearted. He abandons the now, "monster," and leaves it not knowing how to take care of itself, where to go, or how to survive. The reader is manipulated to feel compassion for the dejected monster and only sympathy for the agonizing Victor Frankenstein when we see how distressed he is. ...read more.

Conclusion

This line stands out amongst the rest as Victor's cruel treatment of the creature stands in stark contrast to both his parents' devotion and Clerval's care for him. If we conclude to look at Chapter five compared to the rest of the novel we can see it is a central part to the story as it is where the horror really begins. The later chapters in the novel all show the disastrous consequences of Frankenstein's actions. The purpose of this novel is to teach all a lesson as it shows us what might happen if we continue to play with nature and 'play God.' It also tells us the importance of not judging on appearance, as the creature although kind and benevolent was punished because of the way it looked. It is through the language that we are able to understand the significance of Chapter five as it tells us more about life in the 19th Century, more about the life of Mary Shelley and the way the novel came about. - 1 - Grace Fisher 10F June 2005 ...read more.

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