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Look carefully at the opening chapters of 'Jane Eyre' and explore some of the ways in which Bronte is preparing the reader to follow the fortunes of her heroine.

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Introduction

Look carefully at the opening chapters of 'Jane Eyre' and explore some of the ways in which Bronte is preparing the reader to follow the fortunes of her heroine. 'Jane Eyre was written in 1847 by Charlotte Bronte. Charlotte had five siblings. Two of her sisters were also writers. They all used male names because people would not publish books by women at the time. A lot of the incidents in the book are taken form Charlotte Bronte's life. She had a lot of problems in her life. She had four sisters a brother. Her brother was drug addict and two of her sisters died when she was young. In the opening chapters of 'Jane Eyre' Bronte prepares the reader to follow the fortunes of her heroine in lots of ways. One way Bronte does this is by her presentation of Jane as the narrator to gain the readers sympathy. ...read more.

Middle

All the time people in the house think Jane is bullying John. The lady's-maid said "to strike a young gentleman, your benefactress's son! Your young master!" The lady's-maid blames Jane even though she is the victim. As punishment for fighting her cousin Jane is locked in the red room. Jane's Uncle Reed died in this room for this reason it is very rarely used. This is why it is a very cruel punishment for a young girl to be left in this unused ghostly room. Her Uncle lay in this room for quite a long time. In the book it said "here he lay in state; hence his coffin was borne by the undertaker's men; and, since that day, a sense of dreary consecration had guarded it from frequent intrusion." This shows that because her Uncle lay here dead for so long the room has a spooky feeling to it. ...read more.

Conclusion

In the book Jane was told that she would go to hell if she didn't do what she was told. Nowadays people are less religious and don't believe in hell. Less people go to church and what is taught in schools is not based on religious views as much. Gender relations have also changed. Men are not seen as superior to women and women have a lot more rights. Women like Jane Eyre were very uncommon back in 19th century England because she did not let anyone boss her around. Social class is also very different. In 19th century England upper class almost certainly married upper class and working class almost certainly married working class. In those days if their family was of a certain class then that person was of that class even if they became really successful and got a good job. In the book Jane was seen as working class scum by her Aunt and cousins because they were of a higher class. Akil Browne 10C Mrs Ball 1 ...read more.

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