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Look carefully at the opening three chapters of 'Great Expectations' and explain some of the ways in which Dickens engages our interest as readers.

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Introduction

Look carefully at the opening three chapters of 'Great Expectations' and explain some of the ways in which Dickens engages our interest as readers. You should look in particular at how Dickens uses narrative techniques to present: * the setting and atmosphere * the characters and relationships * society of the time Great Expectation, written by Charles Dickens in 1860-61 is about how a young boys life is changed after he bumps into a convict at his parents graveside. Dickens, in his lifetime experienced going from better off to poverty and then from rags to riches after he started writing novels. His father was a clerk in the Navy Pay Office, but was soon into debt because of poor money management and was imprisoned at Marshalsea Prison. Charles Dickens was taken out of mainstream public education and made to work in a warehouse sticking labels on bottles of bootblack. ...read more.

Middle

He became a very popular writer in both America and England, Dickens often gave public readings from his works and these were extremely popular. He was rich enough to buy a large home called Gad's Hill, which was outside London which was near countryside like that describe at the beginning of 'Great Expectations'. Dickens' health deteriorated as the pressures of touring and the strain of putting great effort into his public readings and doctors advised him to stop. This advice was ignored ad he died in 1870 following a collapse at Gad's Hill. The play starts with Pip describing his family situation and who he lives with and he is an orphan and lives with his sister whom he calls 'Mrs Joe Gargery' which for her being his sister that he has call her by her formal title which one would think is too much perhaps. ...read more.

Conclusion

The words also relate to the atmosphere of the place which is highly unpleasant both the appearance of it and the darkness contained within in it are endlessly vast. Words such as 'savage' and 'rushing' are also used which are perceived as threatening towards Pip, who in comparison is 'the small bundle of shivers, growing afraid of it all and beginning to cry'. This paragraph is of extreme importance to the reader as it explores the imagination of Pip and sets a scene and also makes the next paragraph have a bigger impact. The next paragraph brings both the reader and Pip straight back to reality, as it goes directly into first person speech. '"Hold your noise!" cried a terrible voice'. It describes the man as starting up which metamorphises him as some kind of machine or as the rising dead because he appears from among the graves. ...read more.

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