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Look In Detail At Chapter Eight Of Great Expectations And Consider The Significance Of The Chapter To The Novel As A Whole

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Introduction

Look In Detail At Chapter Eight Of Great Expectations And Consider The Significance Of The Chapter To The Novel As A Whole Chapter 8 is when Pip's Great Expectations start and 'Play Begins'. Pip goes to Satis House because Miss Havisham has asked for a boy to come and 'play'. When going to Miss Havisham's House Pip is introduced to Estella and the moment he sets eyes on her, his 'Great Expectations' begin. Pip thinks that Estella is 'very pretty' and he falls in love with her. However I think Estella is mean and scornful and obnoxious and pompous and stuck-up and thoughtless and it all started because of how Miss Havisham brought her up. I believe that she is like this because she has copious amounts of respect for Miss Havisham. Miss Havisham wants Estella to be spiteful and cold-hearted to men because she got jilted. Estella is obedient to Miss Havisham because she is dependent on her and without her she would have no one else. Estella is an extremely pretty girl 'and seemed very proud'. She is 'like a star'. This relates to the two clear symbols in chapter one of the gibbet and the beacon (one of evil and one of good). I think that Estella can be associated to the beacon because beacons guide ships to safety, and Estella is Pip's guiding light. ...read more.

Middle

he picked Pip. Pip had to go and stay with Mr Pumblechook for a day because it is close to Satis House. When he was staying there Mr Pumblechook was being very greedy, he gave Pip minuet amounts of milk mixed with warm water and a small piece of bread. Mr Pumblechook is very inconsiderate towards Pip because Pip has to sleep in an attic in the corner with his nose a few inches from the roof. Thee seeds can also be a metaphor for Pip himself who needs the right condition to enable him to reach his full potential. He can be seen to be jailed by his childhood. Everyone is against him, it is as if he is fighting an ongoing battle against a brick wall and he has no one to turn to until the wall breaks. Miss Havisham mean to Pip because at exactly 20 to nine she received a letter from her fianc�, Compyson. The letter stated that he doesn't want to marry her any more. This made her 'heart broken' and she ceased all the clocks at 8:40. 8:40 is when her life stopped and she became she prisoner in her own home. I believe that she stopped the clocks, stayed in that one room, left everything in the same place and kept her wedding dress on because she is trying to make herself believe that it didn't happen. ...read more.

Conclusion

'Bringing me up by hand' also means that Mrs Joe brought him up herself and she did everything for a child that isn't hers. This passage therefore makes us feel sorry for Pip as he tells us about his life and how vulnerable he was and that he was hurt 'perpetually' as a child. Dickens uses words like 'violent', 'hunter' and 'injustice' to portray Mrs Joe as a wicked stepmother like in Cinderella. The fable of Cinderella could be associated with the whole book with Mrs Joe and Estella as the wicked stepmothers. The glass slipper incident is portrayed as when Pip gets the money, because he spends the money that he gets from his benefactor on dressing and acting like a gentleman. He is seeing if the slipper of gentlemanliness fits him. In conclusion I believe that Chapter 8 is an extremely important chapter in the novel as this is when Pip begins to peruse his 'Great Expectations'. This chapter is relevant to today because it shows how bitter you can get when something bad happens to you. Don't allow yourself to get bitter you should just get on with life. In Pips life after meeting Estella all he wants to do is become a gentleman, I believe that this is the theme of the book. Becoming a gentleman. Therefore I think that Chapter 8 is the most important chapter in the book due to the reasons given above. ...read more.

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