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Looking at the monsters tale in 'Frankenstein' by Mary Shelley-Discussing how far Victor created a real human being

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Introduction

Looking at the monsters tale in 'Frankenstein' by Mary Shelley-Discussing how far Victor created a real human being Mary Shelley was a Nineteenth-century English novelist. Mary Shelley, the wife of poet Percy Bysshe Shelley, is best known for her philosophical gothic horror story Frankenstein which was wrote in 1816 and published two years later in 1818. The novel was produced during a time of great upheaval and change, and in the era of 'Romanticism'. This was a reaction to the previous 'age of reason' where social order, science, and rationality had dominated the way of thinking. 'Romanticism' celebrated emotions, the exotic, and nature over technology and the individual self. The idea of 'Frankenstein' came to Mary one night when she was staying by a lake in Geneva after telling frightening stories with her husband Percy Bysshe Shelley and Lord Byron. That night Mary had a terrifying dream, she told her husband about the dream the next morning and he encouraged her to develop and expand on what she had dreamt. In the novel, scientist Victor Frankenstein infuses life into a collection of inanimate body parts, the "birth" of his creation overwhelms Frankenstein with the horror of what he has done. The novel 'Frankenstein' is an example of gothic horror. This genre became widely enjoyed because it was adventurous, imaginative and exciting, a complete contrast to all that had gone on during the age of reason. 'Frankenstein' includes some classic characteristics of gothic horror. For example, 'Frankenstein' is set in wild/remote locations, uses imaginative plots and deals with the subjects of identity and the individual self, set apart from society. Certain key events in Mary Shelley's life may have affected and influenced her writing of Frankenstein, for example, she experienced much tragedy throughout her life, with the death of her mother, sister's suicide, and her miscarriage. Her miscarriage made her become increasingly fearful in the advances in medical science at the time; she became very worried about the idea of creating life un-naturally. ...read more.

Middle

I was more agile than they, and could subsist upon coarser diet; I bore the extremes of heat and cold with less injury to my frame; my stature far exceeded theirs. When I looked around, I saw and heard of none like me.' This quote highlights to the reader the differences between him and average humans. The reader may feel sympathetic towards the 'monster' at this point as it seems throughout the 'monsters' story that all he wants is to be a normal human and to be accepted, he realises here he may never be. From the information given in this quote one could argue the fact that victor Frankenstein did not create a human being. The 'monster' describes himself as having a far bigger stature to other humans. He also explains how he is more agile, could live on a coarser diet, and is not as prone to injury. These are good arguments to why victor did not create a human being. The monster then learns who his creator is. 'Accursed creator!' Why did you form a monster so hideous that even you turned from me in disgust?' This quote shows that when the 'monster' finally realises who created him, he is deeply frustrated that his creator, created him, and then abandoned him. Many of the 'monsters' learning processes prove to what extent Victor created a human being. There are both quotes to back up ways that the 'monster' created by Victor, is human and ways that he is not. The 'monsters' learning process is the same as that of a humans. However, the 'monster' had no guidance throughout his learning processes unlike humans, who have parents. Throughout the 'monsters' time in the wilderness he experiences many feelings and emotions ranging from very simple at the start of his life to complex as time goes by. The emotions and feelings experienced by the monster can explain to what extent Victor created a human being. ...read more.

Conclusion

Before the 'monster' was dismissed by all humans he came into contact with, the good-heart, self-sacrificing, and kindness shown by the 'monster' were possibly even stronger than that of some humans. When the 'monster' lost all faith in humans his actions turned to rage full and revengeful actions. The murder he committed on William does not make him a 'monster' as some human's murder. Also, many humans do not even murder for revenge, like the 'monster did, but for other reasons, such as pleasure. Many of the 'monsters' learning processes, feelings , emotions, and actions prove to what extent Victor Frankenstein created a human being. The 'monster' learns a lot of new things, some because he has to in order to stay alive, and others out of choice, he seems to have a desire to learn. The 'monsters' learning process is the same as that of humans. He learns about and experiences all of the human life processes. Although animals have the same life processes, humans can be differentiated by having complex emotions, e.g. sympathy, hatred, and depression, which are all experienced by the 'monster'. The 'monster' possesses many human qualities. He experienced loving emotions which is a human quality. He also, desires social company and is intruiged by humans and sees kindness and good in them. He also appreciates artistic type things, such as, music and feels pain, and reacts to it by crying. There are things that differenciate the 'monster' and humans. For instance, a human being must be conceived by both a man and a woman, not made out of other human's body parts. Another thing, which differentiates him and humans, is the fact that the monster lives out in the wilderness alone, not in a home with a family. In my personal opinion, I feel the 'monster' is human as there are only two reasons to why the 'monster' created by Victor Frankenstein is not human, and far more reasons why he can be classed as a human. In my opinion, a human can be defined by having feelings. The 'monster' certainly does, as he experienced many. ...read more.

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