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Looking particularly at chapter 5 of the novel 'Frankenstein' explore how Mary Shelley creates feelings of horror and foreboding in the reader.

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Introduction

Looking particularly at chapter 5 of the novel 'Frankenstein' explore how Mary Shelley creates feelings of horror and foreboding in the reader Mary Shelley creates horror and foreboding throughout the novel, particularly in chapter 5. This is the point where the creature comes to life. This is done by using traditional gothic horror conventions, creating a characterization of the creature, by contrasting light and dark, alluding to others pieces of literature and developing the theme of responsibility for ones actions. Mary Shelley, born in the early 1800s, first came across the idea of writing the novel from her unusual background she experienced whilst a child. Her mother died during childbirth, leaving Shelley to live with her father and step-mother. Shelley was very interested in science; this has also influenced her novel. Shelley creates gothic feel by using great detail while setting the scene. "It was a dreary night of November..." ...read more.

Middle

The use of the word "livid" implies anger. This makes the reader understand how Elizabeth would feel about what Frankenstein is doing. She disapproves. Shelley's language used continues to create a gothic feel "grave-worms", "shroud", "crawling", "cold", "dew" and "teeth chatter" are words that add to the horrific and graphic imagery of this chilling scene. Shelley creates a scene of foreboding through chapter 5, by the way in which she has Frankenstein run away from the 'monster' he has created. He says "miserable monster whom I created." This tells the reader that Frankenstein regrets what he has created. It also shows lack of responsibility when he runs away leaving the 'monster'. Later on in this scene when the 'monster' chases after Frankenstein, we as the reader automatically think that something bas is to happen. We are made aware of Frankenstein's fear and regret, when he says "I hurried on with irregular steps, not daring to look back". ...read more.

Conclusion

Its seems to imply a 'lonely' life for Victor and a life full of 'fear and dread' and that he will spend the rest of his life with his 'frightful friend' following him (actually his guilt). Mary Shelley ends this chapter in a different way than the read would expect. The reader would expect the 'monster' to find Frankenstein and kill him. Instead Frankenstein falls ill. The chapter ends with Frankenstein talking to Henry Clerval and thinking that Clerval is going to talk about the 'creature'. "An object whom I dared not even think". This shows the reader that Frankenstein is still very anxious about what he has created. But will he take responsibility for his actions? Mark Shelley creates a scene of horror and foreboding in the reader by using different effects, such as allusions and light and dark. This creates a feeling of foreboding and an image of the true horror in the reader's mind. The issues of the time are reflected in her gothic novel and of course as the story continue these feelings of foreboding increase. ?? ?? ?? ?? Sophie Ripley ...read more.

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Response to the question

This essay responds to the question well, picking up on a variety of techniques. There is some clear analysis of how these techniques shape the chapter and the novel, looking at horror, however I feel some ideas could be explored ...

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Response to the question

This essay responds to the question well, picking up on a variety of techniques. There is some clear analysis of how these techniques shape the chapter and the novel, looking at horror, however I feel some ideas could be explored further. Much of this essay explores the implications of specific quotes and features, but there isn't much discussion beyond feature spotting. It is essential to have a clear focus on the task, and in my opinion this is lost and only made relevant in the conclusion.

Level of analysis

The analysis here is sound, with the essay showing clearly the ability to analyse language. I always write in my reviews that I like to see close textual analysis, and there is plenty on display here. For example "Shelley’s language used continues to create a gothic feel 'grave-worms', 'shroud', 'crawling', 'cold', 'dew' and 'teeth chatter' are words that add to the horrific and graphic imagery of this chilling scene." shows the ability to pick out how language is used. However, I do feel that this essay is suspect to feature spotting. There needs to be some further discussion of how techniques are manipulated by Shelley to contribute to the gothic genre, and how this directly affects the reader. Currently, this essay just consists of a set of ideas and no argument as a backbone. As a result, this essay would get marks for analysis, but not for having a clear and coherent argument. I particularly like how this essay writes about Shelley's constructs, and her choice to do things. For example saying "Shelley creates a scene of foreboding" means that it is a natural progression to discuss why she chooses to do this, and what effect it has. It is much better than saying "this scene is foreboding" as this only shows examiners you can spot techniques, rather than looking at how they are used and what effects they have.

Quality of writing

This essay doesn't have the best of structures. The introduction is irrelevant, and I dislike it when an essay begins with the author's birth year and why they were writing. It is much better to introduce a coherent argument which will form the backbone of the essay. Similarly, the conclusion is poor here as it adds nothing to the essay. It simply states that Shelley manages to create a scene filled with horror, but doesn't discuss the significance or what overarching effect it has on the reader. Such ideas and insights will gain you marks. I do like how each paragraph has a concise signpost, as this means points are not repeated and kept clear. Spelling, punctuation and grammar are fine.


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Reviewed by groat 08/04/2012

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