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Lord Of The Flies

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Lord Of The Flies Chapter 4: Painted Faces And Long Hair At the beginning of this chapter the links with civilisation and moral order are still present. However the events of this chapter mark a turning point in the novel. There is a change in the boys behaviour. Earlier they saw life on the island as an adventure until they are rescued. They worked together and made decisions democratically like when Ralph was elected as the leader. They were organised and agreed to rules such as listening to each other and guarding the fire. Here only Jack shows a potential for violence as he wants to look at how rule breakers can be punished. As time passes on the island the link with the moral code and civilisation becomes distant. Roger and Maurice start behaving differently towards the littluns. They enjoy kicking their sandcastles and burying their flowers and scattering the stones they have collected. Maurice "experiences the unease of wrong doing". ...read more.


Killing has now become acceptable. The boys involved in the hunt have broken what was earlier a taboo. Not only are they prepared to kill but they take real pleasure in it "Kill the pig. Cut her throat. Spill her blood." Jack and his followers are losing their contact with civilisation. Their behaviour is becoming inhuman and barbaric. If the boys develop a desire for killing and violence then they maybe tempted to harm each other. It is in this chapter that not only has a pig been killed for the first time but there is also violence between Jack and Piggy. Jacks attack on Piggy is another turning point for the moral code. The restraints of the previous moral standards are breaking down. Piggy who normally tries to avoid confrontation says to Jack "You didn't ought to have let that fire out. You said you'd keep the smoke going-" Jack is angered by this and retaliates violently by punching Piggy in his stomach and with a vicious tone in his voice he shouts, "You would, would you? ...read more.


Even Ralph and Piggy give in to the temptation of the meat, "he meant to refuse the meat." As Jack is the leader of the hunt, the meat makes him more powerful, " I got you meat" Jack takes pleasure in re-counting the hunt and describing how he "cut the pigs throat." Ralph becomes resentful as he watches Jack becoming more powerful and popular. He tries to show his leadership by calling an assembly. This chapter shows the first signs of moral disorder and de-civilisation. The boy's behaviour deteriorates and violence becomes acceptable. This may be because the boys need to survive on the island. They do not have the luxuries of their past life and they need to kill for food. In this environment you have to be strong to survive so Jack tries to assert himself and gain support from others. In civilisation there are laws and rules telling you how to behave otherwise there are consequences. There are no written laws or rules of behaviour on the island and this is the reason why order breaks down. ...read more.

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