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Lord Of The Flies.

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Introduction

Lord Of The Flies William Golding used a group of boys stranded on a tropical island to illustrate the malicious nature of mankind. Lord of the Flies deals with the changes that the boys underwent as they gradually adapted to the freedom from society. It is shown through many ways, but most notably during Simons's conversation with the 'Lord Of The Flies', which is actually a pig's head, when he understands that the beast is a result of the wickedness within themselves. William Golding presents numerous themes and basic ideas in the novel. One of the most obvious themes is that society holds everyone together, and when society breaks down, the basics of right and wrong are lost. Without society's rules, chaos and savagery can come to light. Golding shows that if there is no civilization around us, we will lose our sense of values. Positive qualities are shown at the beginning as the boys try to be civilised in electing leaders, as there are no adults, hence no rules. ...read more.

Middle

Although he is physically unable and clumsy, he has a quick wit and thinks deeply about how to what to do in certain situations. It is his knowledge of the conch shell that allows Ralph to bring the rest of the boys together and he who shows the most concern for some sort of order. This is shown in his interest in names immediately asking Ralph for his, and wishing that Ralph would respond. He is a very organized person, he tries to seem confident and calm, he tries to be an adult figure for the boys but inside he is very insecure. Piggy's main concern is getting back home, as he feels most venerable where there are no rules and unlimited freedom, he has always been with rules and only feels safe with them. "How can you expect to be rescued when you don't put first things first and act proper?" is a good example of this. ...read more.

Conclusion

It is Jack who first oversteps the boundaries of civilized society. His attempts to successfully hunt become, shows everyone his savage nature. The other hunters share savagery, when they dance and sing about killing the pig, they show that they have enjoyed the kick they receive from violence. He claims to be doing what is best for the other boys, but eventually his violent nature takes over and he is controlled only by his want for blood. Jack does show a bit of an interest in the rules of order established on the island, but is only happy when there is a chance of him being able to inflict punishment. I think that during the book, it is human selfishness and the instinct to kill which turns the boys to savages. Golding illustrates human nature in a negative way, during most part of the book. It shows that righteousness is not always the path to follow, as evil can overturn goodness. But there are also positive views on human nature, mainly in the form of Piggy and Simon, who show that if rules are laid down and followed, the savagery can be avoided. ...read more.

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