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Lord of the Flies. A major example of foreshadowing in the book occurs in chapter 5 at the meeting where the boys vote to determine whether or not they believe there is a beast on the island.

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Introduction

A major example of foreshadowing in the book occurs in chapter 5 at the meeting where the boys vote to determine whether or not they believe there is a beast on the island. The boys are arguing about whether or not the beast might exist. The little boys are sure there is a beast and claim to have seen one. Some of the boys think the beast lives in the water. The older boys are hesitant to believe in a beast. Ralph claims there is no such thing, though secretly he fears there might be a beast. Piggy says there is no such thing as a beast; he knows it's illogical. Simon is hesitant to declare what he thinks largely because he doesn't quite know how to articulate what he's thinking. He asks, "What's the dirtiest thing there is?" He's referring to the evil inside of each of them. This foreshadows what Simon will come to be able to articulate later when he has his conversation with the Lord of the Flies in chapter 8 The fire where the boy with the mulberry mark disappears foreshadows the destruction of the island. ...read more.

Middle

For example, a well-constructed novel will imply at the very beginning what the outcome may be. The end is contained in the beginning and this gives structural and thematic unity. In the novel, Lord of the Flies, the author presents many examples of foreshadowing and this presentation will display where they occurred and how they impacted the rest of the book. During chapter two when Roger and a few of the other kids start rolling boulders down the side of the mountain and early in the novel when there is talk about killing pigs for food, meat and other various reasons, the reader interprets this as foreshadowing to Piggy's death. Reasons this is accounted as foreshadowing is because piggy represents weakness to the other boys on the island, as do pigs to the animal society. They both share similar attributes such as defencelessness and physical repulsion. Not to mention they have the same name. In the book Piggy symbolizes not only weakness but also intellect. ...read more.

Conclusion

This is due to it really being a conflict, and conflict is one of the major themes since almost every event or action in this book revolves around it. After Jack fails at his first attempt to kill the pig, he quotes "next time..." This is foreshadowing future slaying, pig hunts and his savage killing. The consistent pig runs and tribal dance shows the groups change into savagery and the loss of civilization on the island. This impacts the novel because in any situation where one is stranded and needs help and to be rescued, it is most important the people stranded remain civilized and work to achieve the group's goal, which is obviously rescue. With the ruin of civilization all order on the island goes completely down the drain and no longer exists and it now becomes a struggle to survive and later pursue the intent of being rescued. Coming to conclusion, foreshadowing is one of the key elements in this book and is used very effectively by the author. In this story particularly the foreshadowing gives that tension and excitement that leaves the reader striving for more. ...read more.

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