• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Lord of the Flies. A major example of foreshadowing in the book occurs in chapter 5 at the meeting where the boys vote to determine whether or not they believe there is a beast on the island.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

A major example of foreshadowing in the book occurs in chapter 5 at the meeting where the boys vote to determine whether or not they believe there is a beast on the island. The boys are arguing about whether or not the beast might exist. The little boys are sure there is a beast and claim to have seen one. Some of the boys think the beast lives in the water. The older boys are hesitant to believe in a beast. Ralph claims there is no such thing, though secretly he fears there might be a beast. Piggy says there is no such thing as a beast; he knows it's illogical. Simon is hesitant to declare what he thinks largely because he doesn't quite know how to articulate what he's thinking. He asks, "What's the dirtiest thing there is?" He's referring to the evil inside of each of them. This foreshadows what Simon will come to be able to articulate later when he has his conversation with the Lord of the Flies in chapter 8 The fire where the boy with the mulberry mark disappears foreshadows the destruction of the island. ...read more.

Middle

For example, a well-constructed novel will imply at the very beginning what the outcome may be. The end is contained in the beginning and this gives structural and thematic unity. In the novel, Lord of the Flies, the author presents many examples of foreshadowing and this presentation will display where they occurred and how they impacted the rest of the book. During chapter two when Roger and a few of the other kids start rolling boulders down the side of the mountain and early in the novel when there is talk about killing pigs for food, meat and other various reasons, the reader interprets this as foreshadowing to Piggy's death. Reasons this is accounted as foreshadowing is because piggy represents weakness to the other boys on the island, as do pigs to the animal society. They both share similar attributes such as defencelessness and physical repulsion. Not to mention they have the same name. In the book Piggy symbolizes not only weakness but also intellect. ...read more.

Conclusion

This is due to it really being a conflict, and conflict is one of the major themes since almost every event or action in this book revolves around it. After Jack fails at his first attempt to kill the pig, he quotes "next time..." This is foreshadowing future slaying, pig hunts and his savage killing. The consistent pig runs and tribal dance shows the groups change into savagery and the loss of civilization on the island. This impacts the novel because in any situation where one is stranded and needs help and to be rescued, it is most important the people stranded remain civilized and work to achieve the group's goal, which is obviously rescue. With the ruin of civilization all order on the island goes completely down the drain and no longer exists and it now becomes a struggle to survive and later pursue the intent of being rescued. Coming to conclusion, foreshadowing is one of the key elements in this book and is used very effectively by the author. In this story particularly the foreshadowing gives that tension and excitement that leaves the reader striving for more. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE William Golding section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE William Golding essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Explore the various factors which contribute to the downfall of the boys society on ...

    3 star(s)

    Ralph was so logical, that his insistence that there was no beast on the island led to the fear gripping the island, particularly the littluns. He was unable to offer any comfort, security or safety, because ironically his 'pig-headed' denial of the existence of the beast or the 'snake-thing', and

  2. Analysis of Lord of the Flies.

    Still, many readers of Lord of the Flies have criticized its ending, feeling that Ralph's death would have provided a more appropriate conclusion to this dark novel. It is certainly true that the biting irony permeating Golding's characterization of the naval officer-who is unable to understand how upstanding British lads

  1. How do the boys organise themselves in chapters 1 & 2 of "Lord of ...

    he would be no good on that sort of job as Piggy is at an obvious physical disadvantage to the others. But Jack thoughtlessly dismisses Piggy (Page 32) "We don't want you." The three boys go off to explore and talk about surviving on the island.

  2. Themes, Motifs, and Symbols - Themes are the fundamental concepts addressed and explored in ...

    Ralph blows the conch shell used to summon the boys and reprimands them in a speech intended to restore order. Yet there is a larger, more insidious problem than keeping the signal fire lit and overcoming the difficulties of hunting: the boys have started to become afraid.

  1. Lord of the Flies Essay How does Golding build up to the final ...

    This brings the two to argue again, and they eventually decide to go up the mountain. When Ralph goes on his own, he sees the sea, describes as "some stupendous creature...the sleeping leviathan" as a horrible monster, or almost as a beast.

  2. Compare how the authors present and use the concept of the island setting in ...

    The boys dive into the island, deciding they own it, and have rule. When they roll the rock off the side of the cliff and destroy the vegetation underneath we see them being destructive for fun. Crusoe works differently with the island and uses its resources to his advantage.

  1. Lord of the Flies - What factors lead to the island community becoming increasingly ...

    HE also laughs at Piggy when he tells Ralph his nickname - showing Ralph's lack of awareness of Piggy as a person with feelings. Through this, Ralph avoids asking Piggy his real name, and so the reader never learns it.

  2. In chapter 5 Ralph says, ¡°Things are breaking up.¡± (Page 102). Having read ...

    Here Jack is finding ways to detach himself from the rule and order of the conch, and succeeding. The first death in the book is when the boy with the mulberry birthmark disappears and is killed in the forest fire.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work