• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Lord of the flies chapter 8

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Chapter 8 raises fundamental issues involving the modification and degradation in certain characters' behaviour from their normal life of civilization. It is the main chapter in which democracy is demolished, savagery kicks in and the definitive chapter in which Simon has the ultimate encounter with the Lord Of The Flies. I will explore Golding's use of symbolism, plot, imagery, language, Christian morals, setting, themes and story structure as well as the novel's overall historical context to establish the fact that chapter 8 is the most significant chapter to the novel as a whole. It is only in chapter eight when Ralph, Piggy and Simon react very differently and for different reasons. Being under the immense pressure because of the gradual immersion of a dystopia; some of the boys lose control; however others capitalise on the fear of the other boys for their own gain. This is the vital episode in which Ralph experiences difficulties dealing with 'the beast.' He acknowledges its existence and in doing so spreads fear amongst the other boys. This is evidenced when Ralph describes the beast as having 'teeth' and 'big black eyes.' Ralph automatically decides that fighting the beast is doing the impossible; which leaves the boys with no alternative than to hide from the beast and live under its shadow. Ralph describes the beast as 'big', leading to the connotation of Ralph's fear and his mention of 'teeth' and 'eyes' suggest further examples of that fear. ...read more.

Middle

' When nobody raises their hand, Jack is devastated and publicly humiliated. He runs down the beach and makes an offer to the boys: 'I'm going off by myself. He can catch his own pigs. Anyone who wants to hunt when I do can come too.' This life is obviously more attractive to most of the boys, killing and feasting instead of keeping a fire going. Therefore, inevitably some boys go on his side and begin to follow his footsteps. Jack persuades the littluns by saying, 'We'll hunt, I'm going to be chief', 'I say this, we aren't going to bother about the beast...we're going to forget the beast.' Jack reacts very violently to the beast, but does not aim his anger at the beast, instead he aims it at Ralph's leadership and at hunting. He has bloodlust and loves to hunt and kill, the food is merely a by-product of the adrenaline that it gives him to hunt, chase and kill another animal. He has passed his passion onto his hunters. This is shown in the book when Golding mentions that, 'The hunters followed, wedded to her in lust, excited by the long chase and the dropped blood...' 'From his reaction to the beast, we learn that Jack is a much more natural leader than Ralph, and that he is a much more violent and ruthless character, he will go to extremes for power, and is a very manipulative and spiteful boy. ...read more.

Conclusion

In this way, Simon echoes Christian ideas and themes without developing precise parallels with them. Because the 'Lord of the Flies' uses its religious motifs to enhance its moral theme, Christian iconography is an artistic technique in the book, but it is not necessarily the primary key to interpreting the story. To conclude, Simon is an important character to the novel because he is what every person should wish to be. The others bully him because he is different from them. The character Simon is perhaps, a role model for the rest of the world. It could really change a lot in the world and if people could at least try and be like Simon, just as Christ wished that people could all live by his beliefs. However, in real life no matter how good people are, they have a certain amount of evil in them, but it is how they control this evil that is important. In the novel, without Simon there is nothing to stop evil reigning supreme and anarchy taking control. This is the message that Golding is conveying through the characterization of Simon. Words-1828 This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ English Literature Coursework (Lord Of The Flies) Assignment 1 Unit 7, Prose 1914 This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE William Golding section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE William Golding essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Read the passages in Chapter 3 where Jack and Simon are each in the ...

    5 star(s)

    The blue colour of his eyes described on both occasions, symbolise the potential for goodness that Jack, and indeed all mankind hold. Later in the novel, Jack's eyes are said to be 'opaque', symbolizing that this potential has been lost; the evil residing within his character has taken over.

  2. Themes, Motifs, and Symbols - Themes are the fundamental concepts addressed and explored in ...

    They then decapitate the sow and place its head on a sharpened stake in the jungle as an offering to the beast. Encountering the bloody, fly-covered head, Simon has a terrible vision, during which it seems to him that the head is speaking.

  1. Analysis of Lord of the Flies.

    He also worries about the smaller children, many of whom have nightmares and are unable to sleep. He tells Jack about his concerns, but Jack, still trying to think of ways to kill a pig, is not interested in Ralph's problems.

  2. Explore the importance of the character Simon in "Lord of the Flies".

    be forming again, but boys such as Robert, Maurice, bill and Rojer sneak off during this process to form another group with Jack. Jack meanwhile is "brilliantly happy" to have won his leadership back, and begins to dictate his terms and manipulate the boy to forget the beast and move on with hunting.

  1. Name and/or Title of the Text: Fight Club (Film) Composer: David Fincher.

    The plainest demonstration of this is the storm, which trashes her perfectly planned holiday. Note that in the stage directions, the fairies single Gwen out for particular attention in the storm. Gwen experiences an epiphany during the walk with Vic, presumably in reaction to the news that Tom is dying.

  2. 'Lord Of The Flies' Is An Allegory. Examine The Symbolism In The Novel. ...

    join Ralph in exploration of the island which itself turns out to be a microcosm representing the world. In the early stages of the book the island is a paradise, as was the world, but due to mans intervention it becomes destroyed by the end of the book, like it almost was at the end of the war.

  1. Compare how the authors present and use the concept of the island setting in ...

    These rules are soon overturned and their society begins to crumble. The boys set up their camp on the beach because they are scared to venture anywhere else for long periods; they have suspicions about a "beast". The beach is seen as a safe, wide open space, nowhere for anything

  2. What role does Ralph play in the novel 'Lord Of The Flies'?

    The conversations as if they were happening, for example during the conversation between Piggy and Ralph when Piggy asks him not to call him 'Piggy' we can almost feel sorry for the boy, he pleads: "I don't care what they call me," he said confidently, "so long as they don't call me what they used to call me at school."

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work