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Lord of The Flies. Goldings Lord of the Flies is a novel that focuses on the instinctual impulses that lies within all humans. Throughout the novel, the characters struggle with the loss of their innocence in various ways.

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Introduction

Golding's "Lord of the Flies" is a novel that focuses on the instinctual impulses that lies within all humans. Throughout the novel, the characters struggle with the loss of their innocence in various ways. Golding points out through the actions of the group of boys that savagery was always instinctually within them and was brought out by their predicament. At the beginning of the novel, the boys on the island stick to their well-behaved demeanors and vote as a group to elect a leader. The group picks Ralph who splits up the group, telling some to find food while telling the others to start a signal fire. At first, this order of hierarchy works for the boys, they continue to hunt for food and keep the signal fire burning strong. ...read more.

Middle

The conflict is soon resolved as one of the boys comes back with his first kill. The boys are fascinated by the tale that the hunter tells of how he killed the animal. The hunter has lost his innocence because he has just killed an animal in cold blood in order to feed the boys. One character, Piggy, criticizes the hunter for bragging about killing the animal. The hunter physically assaults Piggy for speaking back to him. This is one of the first indications that the boys are becoming more violent as their time on the island increases. Throughout the novel, the boys split up into two different groups due to conflict over how the group is run. ...read more.

Conclusion

The Naval officer cannot help but to notice the savagery and barbarism of the boys. Ralph and the other boys weep because the Naval officer serves as an example of the real world which they were previously a part of. Ralph and the boys realize what they have become and regret all that they have done. Golding successfully shows how certain situations can bring about savagery within people. The boys in the novel quickly lose their innocence as they fail to conform to the rules presented to them. The boys resort to killing not only animals but also other humans in order to survive their time on the island. By the end of the novel, the boys realize what they have turned into, but it seems to be too late. ...read more.

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