• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Lord of the flies: How does Golding Present the Loss of Innocence?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Lord of the flies: How does Golding Present the Loss of Innocence? In Goldings' Lord of the flies, the boys slowly loose their civilisation and become savages as they also loose their innocence as their original sin is revealed represented by the 'beast'. He slowly describes them in ways to show us the change from what we know as good to evil. As Golding unveils the boy's original sin, he slowly begins to refer to the boys as savages and even devils. He writes "...behind the tribe and the anonymous devils' face swarmed across the neck." This is very effective as it indicates to the reader that Golding now I confirming the boys are drenched in Original sin as he labels them 'devils' after they have killed Piggy. The innocence of the boys is lost as two of the boys are killed by other boys on the island. Piggy is killed when Roger releases a very large rock and it plunges him to his death. It says "...Piggy fell forty feet and landed on his back...his head opened and stuff came out and turned red." ...read more.

Middle

Golding writes "He passed like a shadow under the darkness of the tree and crouched, looking down at the trodden ground at his feet." The effect of the words 'shadow' and 'darkness' suggest a sense of evil in Jack and his behaviour as Jack was the leader in the killing of the Christ-like figure Simon, showing us his loss of innocence. Golding presents the loss of innocence by firstly describing the island as perfect but at the same time he indicates to us that the boys' very presence is tainting the island. He does this by calling the mark the aeroplane left when it crashed, a 'scar'. It shows the boys had already made their mark on the island. He writes "...the long scar smashed into the jungle." The effect of the onomatopoeia 'smashed' suggests that the boys had destroyed something that had always been there. The island can be compared to the Garden of Eden as it is also described as paradise before Adam and Eve ruin it. ...read more.

Conclusion

The painted faces are emblematic of their constant decline into savagery and their continuous movement away from innocence. The effect of Golding saying 'looked down from behind his paint' suggests that the boys are using the paint to cover up what they normally are the paint is a stepping stone into helping them becoming even more evil and savage. In this book Golding has built up Rogers character who has been throwing stones. However every time Roger throws these stones at other, he throws to miss which indicates he still has innocence left in him. This is until all the innocence leaves him. He writes "Roger, with a sense of delirious abandonment, leaned all his weight on the lever." The effect of this is that is shows the reader that the boys no longer have an ounce of civilisation in them and can not deter right from wrong leading to the killing of Piggy. It tells us that they have become such 'devils' their own sin has overwhelmed them and they are no longer innocent boys as they were when they first landed on this island. They are as Golding would probably would say, Devilish Savages. ?? ?? ?? ?? Zoe-Alexandra Oparah 10.4 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE William Golding section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

4 star(s)

A very good answer to the question showing knowledge and understanding of the novel. Deals with some of the biblical symbolism and issues that Golding explores in the novel.
Some lapses in expression which make the meaning of certain phrases and therefore the argument unclear.

Marked by teacher Katie Dixon 02/03/2012

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE William Golding essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Compare and contrast Defoe's Robinson Crusoe with Golding's Lord of the Flies.

    4 star(s)

    for survival not only in the physical sense but also in the sense that he fights for his belief that civilisation would conquer all difficulties. The main character of Defoe's book is Robinson Crusoe. Crusoe wanted to go to sea and explore rather than follow his father's wishes and practise

  2. Marked by a teacher

    How does William Golding show evil at work in Lord of the Flies?

    3 star(s)

    Another way in which Golding incorporates evil within the novel is when a child was killed because of the lack of control the boy's had over the fire. It also took them a while before that they noticed he was missing and it was Piggy who noticed it.

  1. Peer reviewed

    law and order lord of the flies

    5 star(s)

    Ralph responds cautiously, "If I blow the conch and they don't come back; then we've had it. We shan't keep the fire going. We'll be like animals. We'll never be rescued". The balance between order and freedom that he represents is as fragile as the conch.

  2. 'Lord of the Flies': Simon Essay.

    This signifies two things; firstly that Simons death has a universal importance in a macrocosm much wider than the island. I think he is also trying to show that the world is in many ways like the island, a microcosm in a much larger macrocosm, and whatever destruction and suffering

  1. Lord of the Flies Essay: Importance of Ralph

    By doing this he wins the boys respect and confidence in his leadership abilities. Ralph uses his authority to try to improve the boys' society. By building shelters he demonstrates his knowledge of the boys' needs. When he says to Jack, "They talk and scream.

  2. Explore the Significance of Simon's Death in Lord of the Flies.

    This represents Simons underlying affect on the group. When he is walking through the jungle towards his cavern, he comes across some small children, "little-uns". They are trying to reach some fruit located just beyond their grasp in a tree. Simon obligingly picks the 'choicest' fruit from the foliage and passes it back down to the 'endless outstretched hands'.

  1. Significance of the Island Lord of the Flies

    Akin to the island, the boys have an innate evil characteristic. Not only does the island hold many symbols in and of itself, but the island can be used as a metaphor to describe the innate evil of man-kind.

  2. How does Golding present the theme of savagery and civilisation in "Lord of ...

    We can interpret this as being very animalistic due to the fact only animals drink out of rivers and lakes. There is also this presentation of primitive and animalistic behaviour, when the rule of going to the toilet behind a rock - on the beach so the tide washes away the mess - is broken.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work