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Lord of the flies: How does Golding Present the Loss of Innocence?

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Lord of the flies: How does Golding Present the Loss of Innocence? In Goldings' Lord of the flies, the boys slowly loose their civilisation and become savages as they also loose their innocence as their original sin is revealed represented by the 'beast'. He slowly describes them in ways to show us the change from what we know as good to evil. As Golding unveils the boy's original sin, he slowly begins to refer to the boys as savages and even devils. He writes "...behind the tribe and the anonymous devils' face swarmed across the neck." This is very effective as it indicates to the reader that Golding now I confirming the boys are drenched in Original sin as he labels them 'devils' after they have killed Piggy. The innocence of the boys is lost as two of the boys are killed by other boys on the island. Piggy is killed when Roger releases a very large rock and it plunges him to his death. It says "...Piggy fell forty feet and landed on his back...his head opened and stuff came out and turned red." ...read more.


Golding writes "He passed like a shadow under the darkness of the tree and crouched, looking down at the trodden ground at his feet." The effect of the words 'shadow' and 'darkness' suggest a sense of evil in Jack and his behaviour as Jack was the leader in the killing of the Christ-like figure Simon, showing us his loss of innocence. Golding presents the loss of innocence by firstly describing the island as perfect but at the same time he indicates to us that the boys' very presence is tainting the island. He does this by calling the mark the aeroplane left when it crashed, a 'scar'. It shows the boys had already made their mark on the island. He writes "...the long scar smashed into the jungle." The effect of the onomatopoeia 'smashed' suggests that the boys had destroyed something that had always been there. The island can be compared to the Garden of Eden as it is also described as paradise before Adam and Eve ruin it. ...read more.


The painted faces are emblematic of their constant decline into savagery and their continuous movement away from innocence. The effect of Golding saying 'looked down from behind his paint' suggests that the boys are using the paint to cover up what they normally are the paint is a stepping stone into helping them becoming even more evil and savage. In this book Golding has built up Rogers character who has been throwing stones. However every time Roger throws these stones at other, he throws to miss which indicates he still has innocence left in him. This is until all the innocence leaves him. He writes "Roger, with a sense of delirious abandonment, leaned all his weight on the lever." The effect of this is that is shows the reader that the boys no longer have an ounce of civilisation in them and can not deter right from wrong leading to the killing of Piggy. It tells us that they have become such 'devils' their own sin has overwhelmed them and they are no longer innocent boys as they were when they first landed on this island. They are as Golding would probably would say, Devilish Savages. ?? ?? ?? ?? Zoe-Alexandra Oparah 10.4 ...read more.

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Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

4 star(s)

A very good answer to the question showing knowledge and understanding of the novel. Deals with some of the biblical symbolism and issues that Golding explores in the novel.
Some lapses in expression which make the meaning of certain phrases and therefore the argument unclear.

Marked by teacher Katie Dixon 02/03/2012

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